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Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges.

Hench LL, Jones JR - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

Bottom Line: Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues.This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass(®).The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida Institute of Technology , Melbourne, FL , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass(®). The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

X-ray microtomography image of 3-D printed bioactive glass scaffolds. Modified with permission from Jones (2013).
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Figure 4: X-ray microtomography image of 3-D printed bioactive glass scaffolds. Modified with permission from Jones (2013).

Mentions: 3-D printing has delivered bioactive glass scaffolds with interconnected pores similar in diameter to the porous foam scaffolds developed previously (Figure 4), but with compressive strengths at least an order of magnitude higher, increasing from 2.4 MPa for the foams of 80% porosity (Jones et al., 2006) to >140 MPa for the 3-D printed scaffolds (Fu et al., 2011b). The reason for this is that the layer by layer printing process can deposit thick aligned struts (>50 μm), leaving wide channels in excess of 500 μm, with percentage porosities of 60% (Doiphode et al., 2011; Huang et al., 2011; Kolan et al., 2011).


Bioactive Glasses: Frontiers and Challenges.

Hench LL, Jones JR - Front Bioeng Biotechnol (2015)

X-ray microtomography image of 3-D printed bioactive glass scaffolds. Modified with permission from Jones (2013).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663244&req=5

Figure 4: X-ray microtomography image of 3-D printed bioactive glass scaffolds. Modified with permission from Jones (2013).
Mentions: 3-D printing has delivered bioactive glass scaffolds with interconnected pores similar in diameter to the porous foam scaffolds developed previously (Figure 4), but with compressive strengths at least an order of magnitude higher, increasing from 2.4 MPa for the foams of 80% porosity (Jones et al., 2006) to >140 MPa for the 3-D printed scaffolds (Fu et al., 2011b). The reason for this is that the layer by layer printing process can deposit thick aligned struts (>50 μm), leaving wide channels in excess of 500 μm, with percentage porosities of 60% (Doiphode et al., 2011; Huang et al., 2011; Kolan et al., 2011).

Bottom Line: Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues.This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass(®).The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida Institute of Technology , Melbourne, FL , USA.

ABSTRACT
Bioactive glasses were discovered in 1969 and provided for the first time an alternative to nearly inert implant materials. Bioglass formed a rapid, strong, and stable bond with host tissues. This article examines the frontiers of research crossed to achieve clinical use of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics. In the 1980s, it was discovered that bioactive glasses could be used in particulate form to stimulate osteogenesis, which thereby led to the concept of regeneration of tissues. Later, it was discovered that the dissolution ions from the glasses behaved like growth factors, providing signals to the cells. This article summarizes the frontiers of knowledge crossed during four eras of development of bioactive glasses that have led from concept of bioactivity to widespread clinical and commercial use, with emphasis on the first composition, 45S5 Bioglass(®). The four eras are (a) discovery, (b) clinical application, (c) tissue regeneration, and (d) innovation. Questions still to be answered for the fourth era are included to stimulate innovation in the field and exploration of new frontiers that can be the basis for a general theory of bioactive stimulation of regeneration of tissues and application to numerous clinical needs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus