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Interacting Effects of Instructions and Presentation Rate on Visual Statistical Learning.

Bertels J, Destrebecqz A, Franco A - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Supporting Arciuli et al.'s (2014) claim, participant performance only benefited from intentional instructions at slow presentation rates.Moreover, informing participants beforehand about the existence of statistical regularities increased their explicit knowledge of the sequences, an effect that was not modulated by presentation speed.These results support that, although visual statistical learning can take place incidentally and, to some extent, outside conscious awareness, factors such as presentation rate and prior knowledge can boost learning of these regularities, presumably by favoring the acquisition of explicit knowledge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Brussels, Belgium ; Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique - FNRS Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The statistical regularities of a sequence of visual shapes can be learned incidentally. Arciuli et al. (2014) recently argued that intentional instructions only improve learning at slow presentation rates as they favor the use of explicit strategies. The aim of the present study was (1) to test this assumption directly by investigating how instructions (incidental vs. intentional) and presentation rate (fast vs. slow) affect the acquisition of knowledge and (2) to examine how these factors influence the conscious vs. unconscious nature of the knowledge acquired. To this aim, we exposed participants to four triplets of shapes, presented sequentially in a pseudo-random order, and assessed their degree of learning in a subsequent completion task that integrated confidence judgments. Supporting Arciuli et al.'s (2014) claim, participant performance only benefited from intentional instructions at slow presentation rates. Moreover, informing participants beforehand about the existence of statistical regularities increased their explicit knowledge of the sequences, an effect that was not modulated by presentation speed. These results support that, although visual statistical learning can take place incidentally and, to some extent, outside conscious awareness, factors such as presentation rate and prior knowledge can boost learning of these regularities, presumably by favoring the acquisition of explicit knowledge.

No MeSH data available.


Groups of three shapes constituting each of the four triplets, by order of presentation (1, 2, 3).
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Figure 1: Groups of three shapes constituting each of the four triplets, by order of presentation (1, 2, 3).

Mentions: The visual stimuli consisted of 12 black shapes presented on a white background, adapted from Fiser and Aslin (2001). Each stimulus was about 3 cm by 3 cm. Stimuli constituted four ‘triplets’; namely, four sequences of three stimuli presented in a fixed order (Figure 1). As we did not report any effect of stimulus make-up in a previous study (Bertels et al., 2012), we only used one arrangement of four triplets (see also Arciuli and Simpson, 2011, 2012; Bertels et al., 2013, 2015).


Interacting Effects of Instructions and Presentation Rate on Visual Statistical Learning.

Bertels J, Destrebecqz A, Franco A - Front Psychol (2015)

Groups of three shapes constituting each of the four triplets, by order of presentation (1, 2, 3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663239&req=5

Figure 1: Groups of three shapes constituting each of the four triplets, by order of presentation (1, 2, 3).
Mentions: The visual stimuli consisted of 12 black shapes presented on a white background, adapted from Fiser and Aslin (2001). Each stimulus was about 3 cm by 3 cm. Stimuli constituted four ‘triplets’; namely, four sequences of three stimuli presented in a fixed order (Figure 1). As we did not report any effect of stimulus make-up in a previous study (Bertels et al., 2012), we only used one arrangement of four triplets (see also Arciuli and Simpson, 2011, 2012; Bertels et al., 2013, 2015).

Bottom Line: Supporting Arciuli et al.'s (2014) claim, participant performance only benefited from intentional instructions at slow presentation rates.Moreover, informing participants beforehand about the existence of statistical regularities increased their explicit knowledge of the sequences, an effect that was not modulated by presentation speed.These results support that, although visual statistical learning can take place incidentally and, to some extent, outside conscious awareness, factors such as presentation rate and prior knowledge can boost learning of these regularities, presumably by favoring the acquisition of explicit knowledge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Brussels, Belgium ; Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique - FNRS Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The statistical regularities of a sequence of visual shapes can be learned incidentally. Arciuli et al. (2014) recently argued that intentional instructions only improve learning at slow presentation rates as they favor the use of explicit strategies. The aim of the present study was (1) to test this assumption directly by investigating how instructions (incidental vs. intentional) and presentation rate (fast vs. slow) affect the acquisition of knowledge and (2) to examine how these factors influence the conscious vs. unconscious nature of the knowledge acquired. To this aim, we exposed participants to four triplets of shapes, presented sequentially in a pseudo-random order, and assessed their degree of learning in a subsequent completion task that integrated confidence judgments. Supporting Arciuli et al.'s (2014) claim, participant performance only benefited from intentional instructions at slow presentation rates. Moreover, informing participants beforehand about the existence of statistical regularities increased their explicit knowledge of the sequences, an effect that was not modulated by presentation speed. These results support that, although visual statistical learning can take place incidentally and, to some extent, outside conscious awareness, factors such as presentation rate and prior knowledge can boost learning of these regularities, presumably by favoring the acquisition of explicit knowledge.

No MeSH data available.