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Physical and psychosocial side-effects of brachytherapy: a questionnaire survey.

Ferenc S, Rzymski P, Skowronek J, Karczewski J - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

Bottom Line: Interviews concerned the occurrence of 35 physical (dermatological, gastroenterological, neurological, ocular, pulmonological, and urological) and 10 psychosocial side effects of BT.Overweight patients were characterized by an increased rate of urinary incontinence and dyschezia, as well as more pronounced decrease of self-esteem and sense of security following BT treatment.These findings are not only highly relevant to the way patients can be prepared for the therapy but also have a bearing on ways to minimize the number and severity of BT side effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Brachytherapy (BT) plays an important role in cancer treatment. Like any other medical therapy it may, however, induce side effects whose recognition can affect the patient's quality of life. Therefore, the present study evaluated the frequency and severity of physical and psychosocial adverse effects of BT.

Material and methods: Patients (n = 70) undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR) BT or low-dose-rate (LDR) of head and neck, breast, and prostate cancers were interviewed face-to-face at the end of their course of treatment. Interviews concerned the occurrence of 35 physical (dermatological, gastroenterological, neurological, ocular, pulmonological, and urological) and 10 psychosocial side effects of BT.

Results: A high percentage of patients reported that BT decreased their life satisfaction (54.3%), sense of security (41.4%), and self-esteem (34.3%). The highest frequency of gastroenterological and urological symptoms was reported by prostate cancer patients. Cigarette smoking increased the frequency of nausea, dyschezia, and weight loss. Overweight patients were characterized by an increased rate of urinary incontinence and dyschezia, as well as more pronounced decrease of self-esteem and sense of security following BT treatment.

Conclusions: These findings are not only highly relevant to the way patients can be prepared for the therapy but also have a bearing on ways to minimize the number and severity of BT side effects.

No MeSH data available.


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The frequency of reported brachytherapy effects on the psychosocial function of treated patients
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Figure 0001: The frequency of reported brachytherapy effects on the psychosocial function of treated patients

Mentions: Brachytherapy treatment was found to be responsible for various adverse psychosocial effects in the studied group (Fig. 1). Over 50% of patients reported that the treatment had decreased their general life satisfaction, over 40% that it decreased their sense of security, while over 30% stated that it had affected their self-esteem and altered their financial status. No differences in the frequency of any psychosocial effects of BT were reported in groups of patients suffering from different forms of cancer. These effects appeared not to depend on smoking or drinking habits. However, it was found that compared to patients with BMI in the 18.5-24.9 range, overweight patients experienced a higher frequency of decreased self-esteem (9.1 vs. 40.0%; p < 0.05) and a lessened sense of security (38.2 vs. 53.3%; p < 0.05) following the BT treatment.


Physical and psychosocial side-effects of brachytherapy: a questionnaire survey.

Ferenc S, Rzymski P, Skowronek J, Karczewski J - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

The frequency of reported brachytherapy effects on the psychosocial function of treated patients
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663207&req=5

Figure 0001: The frequency of reported brachytherapy effects on the psychosocial function of treated patients
Mentions: Brachytherapy treatment was found to be responsible for various adverse psychosocial effects in the studied group (Fig. 1). Over 50% of patients reported that the treatment had decreased their general life satisfaction, over 40% that it decreased their sense of security, while over 30% stated that it had affected their self-esteem and altered their financial status. No differences in the frequency of any psychosocial effects of BT were reported in groups of patients suffering from different forms of cancer. These effects appeared not to depend on smoking or drinking habits. However, it was found that compared to patients with BMI in the 18.5-24.9 range, overweight patients experienced a higher frequency of decreased self-esteem (9.1 vs. 40.0%; p < 0.05) and a lessened sense of security (38.2 vs. 53.3%; p < 0.05) following the BT treatment.

Bottom Line: Interviews concerned the occurrence of 35 physical (dermatological, gastroenterological, neurological, ocular, pulmonological, and urological) and 10 psychosocial side effects of BT.Overweight patients were characterized by an increased rate of urinary incontinence and dyschezia, as well as more pronounced decrease of self-esteem and sense of security following BT treatment.These findings are not only highly relevant to the way patients can be prepared for the therapy but also have a bearing on ways to minimize the number and severity of BT side effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Brachytherapy (BT) plays an important role in cancer treatment. Like any other medical therapy it may, however, induce side effects whose recognition can affect the patient's quality of life. Therefore, the present study evaluated the frequency and severity of physical and psychosocial adverse effects of BT.

Material and methods: Patients (n = 70) undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR) BT or low-dose-rate (LDR) of head and neck, breast, and prostate cancers were interviewed face-to-face at the end of their course of treatment. Interviews concerned the occurrence of 35 physical (dermatological, gastroenterological, neurological, ocular, pulmonological, and urological) and 10 psychosocial side effects of BT.

Results: A high percentage of patients reported that BT decreased their life satisfaction (54.3%), sense of security (41.4%), and self-esteem (34.3%). The highest frequency of gastroenterological and urological symptoms was reported by prostate cancer patients. Cigarette smoking increased the frequency of nausea, dyschezia, and weight loss. Overweight patients were characterized by an increased rate of urinary incontinence and dyschezia, as well as more pronounced decrease of self-esteem and sense of security following BT treatment.

Conclusions: These findings are not only highly relevant to the way patients can be prepared for the therapy but also have a bearing on ways to minimize the number and severity of BT side effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus