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Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Role of Medical, Surgical, and Endoscopic Weight Loss.

Popov VB, Lim JK - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.NAFLD comprises a spectrum of liver conditions, ranging from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (steatohepatitis) and progressive fibrosis.Weight loss represents a first line therapeutic modality for the management of NAFLD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD comprises a spectrum of liver conditions, ranging from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (steatohepatitis) and progressive fibrosis. Weight loss represents a first line therapeutic modality for the management of NAFLD. Herein, we review the evidence base for medical, surgical, and endoscopic approaches to weight loss and their potential impact on the natural history of NAFLD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Natural history of NAFLD.
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f01: Natural history of NAFLD.

Mentions: Patients with steatohepatitis may progress to liver cirrhosis and develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Roughly 25% of NASH patients will develop fibrosis and liver cirrhosis, and about 10% will develop end-stage liver disease (Fig. 1). Cirrhosis secondary to NASH is projected to become the most common indication for liver transplantation in next 20–30 years.9


Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Role of Medical, Surgical, and Endoscopic Weight Loss.

Popov VB, Lim JK - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Natural history of NAFLD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663205&req=5

f01: Natural history of NAFLD.
Mentions: Patients with steatohepatitis may progress to liver cirrhosis and develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Roughly 25% of NASH patients will develop fibrosis and liver cirrhosis, and about 10% will develop end-stage liver disease (Fig. 1). Cirrhosis secondary to NASH is projected to become the most common indication for liver transplantation in next 20–30 years.9

Bottom Line: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.NAFLD comprises a spectrum of liver conditions, ranging from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (steatohepatitis) and progressive fibrosis.Weight loss represents a first line therapeutic modality for the management of NAFLD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gastroenterology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD comprises a spectrum of liver conditions, ranging from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (steatohepatitis) and progressive fibrosis. Weight loss represents a first line therapeutic modality for the management of NAFLD. Herein, we review the evidence base for medical, surgical, and endoscopic approaches to weight loss and their potential impact on the natural history of NAFLD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus