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Thrombotic Venous Diseases of the Liver.

Sabol TP, Molina M, Wu GY - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Graduate Medical Education, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast-enhanced CT.A, Acute thrombosis of the umbilical segment of the left portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Contrast opacification is seen proximally in the left portal vein (blue arrow); B, Acute thrombosis of the right portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow) 2 months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A; C, Several months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A, thrombosis has propagated to the main portal vein and is similarly seen as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Incidentally, there is a subacute hematoma anteriorly after a liver biopsy; D, Follow-up CT 1 year later demonstrates cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Numerous tortuous venous collaterals have replaced the chronically thrombosed portal vein (yellow arrow).
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f02: Contrast-enhanced CT.A, Acute thrombosis of the umbilical segment of the left portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Contrast opacification is seen proximally in the left portal vein (blue arrow); B, Acute thrombosis of the right portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow) 2 months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A; C, Several months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A, thrombosis has propagated to the main portal vein and is similarly seen as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Incidentally, there is a subacute hematoma anteriorly after a liver biopsy; D, Follow-up CT 1 year later demonstrates cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Numerous tortuous venous collaterals have replaced the chronically thrombosed portal vein (yellow arrow).

Mentions: Contrast enhanced CT and MRI are superior imaging techniques to evaluate the portal system and mesenteric circulation, as they can be visualized in their entirety.20,21 Bland thrombus in a contrast enhanced exam is hypodense on CT (Fig. 2A–2C) and hypointense on MRI (Fig. 3). Once cavernous transformation is present, the main and often right and left portal veins are difficult to identify and are replaced by numerous enhancing collaterals in the porta hepatis (Fig. 2D).


Thrombotic Venous Diseases of the Liver.

Sabol TP, Molina M, Wu GY - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Contrast-enhanced CT.A, Acute thrombosis of the umbilical segment of the left portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Contrast opacification is seen proximally in the left portal vein (blue arrow); B, Acute thrombosis of the right portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow) 2 months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A; C, Several months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A, thrombosis has propagated to the main portal vein and is similarly seen as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Incidentally, there is a subacute hematoma anteriorly after a liver biopsy; D, Follow-up CT 1 year later demonstrates cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Numerous tortuous venous collaterals have replaced the chronically thrombosed portal vein (yellow arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663200&req=5

f02: Contrast-enhanced CT.A, Acute thrombosis of the umbilical segment of the left portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Contrast opacification is seen proximally in the left portal vein (blue arrow); B, Acute thrombosis of the right portal vein presenting as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow) 2 months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A; C, Several months later in the same patient as Fig. 2A, thrombosis has propagated to the main portal vein and is similarly seen as a hypodense filling defect (yellow arrow). Incidentally, there is a subacute hematoma anteriorly after a liver biopsy; D, Follow-up CT 1 year later demonstrates cavernous transformation of the portal vein. Numerous tortuous venous collaterals have replaced the chronically thrombosed portal vein (yellow arrow).
Mentions: Contrast enhanced CT and MRI are superior imaging techniques to evaluate the portal system and mesenteric circulation, as they can be visualized in their entirety.20,21 Bland thrombus in a contrast enhanced exam is hypodense on CT (Fig. 2A–2C) and hypointense on MRI (Fig. 3). Once cavernous transformation is present, the main and often right and left portal veins are difficult to identify and are replaced by numerous enhancing collaterals in the porta hepatis (Fig. 2D).

Bottom Line: Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Graduate Medical Education, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus