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Thrombotic Venous Diseases of the Liver.

Sabol TP, Molina M, Wu GY - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Graduate Medical Education, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Imaging characteristics of portal vein thrombosis.A, Greyscale ultrasound. Greyscale sonographic image demonstrates intraluminal echogenic material in the main portal vein, compatible with thrombus (yellow arrow); B, Power Doppler ultrasound. Power Doppler demonstrates thrombosis with lack of internal flow within the main portal vein (yellow arrow).
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f01: Imaging characteristics of portal vein thrombosis.A, Greyscale ultrasound. Greyscale sonographic image demonstrates intraluminal echogenic material in the main portal vein, compatible with thrombus (yellow arrow); B, Power Doppler ultrasound. Power Doppler demonstrates thrombosis with lack of internal flow within the main portal vein (yellow arrow).

Mentions: Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT) are frequently used imaging techniques to assist in the diagnosis of PVT.2 Doppler ultrasound is the first line imaging modality used due to its general availability, low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. The lumen of the portal vein can usually be easily visualized. Doppler imaging has the added benefit of determining the presence and direction of blood flow within vessels. In PVT, grey-scale ultrasound demonstrates intraluminal hyperechoic thrombus, often distending the vein (Fig. 1A). Color doppler or power doppler will demonstrate lack of color flow in an occluded portal vein (Fig. 1B). Spectral doppler waveforms will be unobtainable in bland thrombus. If color and spectral doppler flow is present within the thrombus, malignant thrombus would be considered. Chronic PVT manifest as multiple collateral vessels (cavernous transformation) in the porta hepatis. Ultrasound is of limited value in visualizing the superior mesenteric vein or mesenteric circulation,20 but this limitation of ultrasound can be overcome with CT or MRI.


Thrombotic Venous Diseases of the Liver.

Sabol TP, Molina M, Wu GY - J Clin Transl Hepatol (2015)

Imaging characteristics of portal vein thrombosis.A, Greyscale ultrasound. Greyscale sonographic image demonstrates intraluminal echogenic material in the main portal vein, compatible with thrombus (yellow arrow); B, Power Doppler ultrasound. Power Doppler demonstrates thrombosis with lack of internal flow within the main portal vein (yellow arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4663200&req=5

f01: Imaging characteristics of portal vein thrombosis.A, Greyscale ultrasound. Greyscale sonographic image demonstrates intraluminal echogenic material in the main portal vein, compatible with thrombus (yellow arrow); B, Power Doppler ultrasound. Power Doppler demonstrates thrombosis with lack of internal flow within the main portal vein (yellow arrow).
Mentions: Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT) are frequently used imaging techniques to assist in the diagnosis of PVT.2 Doppler ultrasound is the first line imaging modality used due to its general availability, low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. The lumen of the portal vein can usually be easily visualized. Doppler imaging has the added benefit of determining the presence and direction of blood flow within vessels. In PVT, grey-scale ultrasound demonstrates intraluminal hyperechoic thrombus, often distending the vein (Fig. 1A). Color doppler or power doppler will demonstrate lack of color flow in an occluded portal vein (Fig. 1B). Spectral doppler waveforms will be unobtainable in bland thrombus. If color and spectral doppler flow is present within the thrombus, malignant thrombus would be considered. Chronic PVT manifest as multiple collateral vessels (cavernous transformation) in the porta hepatis. Ultrasound is of limited value in visualizing the superior mesenteric vein or mesenteric circulation,20 but this limitation of ultrasound can be overcome with CT or MRI.

Bottom Line: Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Graduate Medical Education, Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thrombotic venous diseases of the liver do not occur frequently, but when they do, they can present as difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic options of these serious vascular problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus