Limits...
Vaccination against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in two Swedish dairy herds.

Landin H, Mörk MJ, Larsson M, Waller KP - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Bottom Line: In herds where normal control measures are not successful, vaccination might be an additional tool to use if sufficiently efficient.Significant differences between vaccinated and control groups were not found in any of the parameters investigated.Vaccination with a commercial polyvalent vaccine did not have any beneficial effects on udder health, milk production or survival in two commercial dairy herds with mastitis problems due to S. aureus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Växa Sverige, SE-104 25, Stockholm, Sweden. hakan.landin@vxa.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a common udder pathogen in dairy cows, and may cause severe mastitis problems in some herds. In herds where normal control measures are not successful, vaccination might be an additional tool to use if sufficiently efficient. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available vaccine (Startvac(®), Hipra, Spain) in two commercial Swedish dairy herds where the control programs for S. aureus mastitis had been unsuccessful. Within each herd cows were randomly assigned to vaccine or control groups, and effects on udder health and milk production during 120 days after calving, and survival during the following lactation were evaluated.

Results: A field study was performed in two high producing Swedish herds having approximately 600 (herd A) and 200 (herd B) cows. During 12 months, cows with odd numbers were vaccinated three times around calving according to label protocol, while cows with even numbers constituted the not vaccinated control group. Quarter milk samples for bacteriological culturing were collected from all cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. The outcome was evaluated during 120 days after calving using data on SCC and daily milk yield at monthly milk recordings, and incidence of mastitis due to S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and coliforms. Cow survival throughout lactation was also studied. In herd A, 239 and 240 cows were included in the vaccinated and control groups, respectively. Corresponding numbers for herd B was 126 and 151 cows. Significant differences between vaccinated and control groups were not found in any of the parameters investigated.

Conclusions: Vaccination with a commercial polyvalent vaccine did not have any beneficial effects on udder health, milk production or survival in two commercial dairy herds with mastitis problems due to S. aureus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Presence of udder pathogens in vaccinated and not vaccinated cows. Proportions (%) of sampled cows having growth of different groups of udder pathogens (CNS coagulase-negative staphylococci) in 295 udder quarter milk samples from 232 cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis during the first 4 months after calving in vaccinated (vacc) and not vaccinated control (con) cows in herd A and B
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660610&req=5

Fig3: Presence of udder pathogens in vaccinated and not vaccinated cows. Proportions (%) of sampled cows having growth of different groups of udder pathogens (CNS coagulase-negative staphylococci) in 295 udder quarter milk samples from 232 cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis during the first 4 months after calving in vaccinated (vacc) and not vaccinated control (con) cows in herd A and B

Mentions: A total of 295 udder quarter samples from 232 cows (71 vaccinated and 51 control cows in herd A, and 49 vaccinated and 61 control cows in herd B) with CM or SCM were analyzed for bacterial growth. Of those 232 cows, 172 (74.1 %) had growth of S. aureus, CNS, streptococci or coliforms. The proportions of sampled cows with growth of different groups of udder pathogens divided by herd and treatment group are shown in Fig. 3. The probability of mastitis due to S. aureus, CNS, streptococci or coliforms did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The OR for the vaccinated group compared to the control group was 1.03 (95 % CI 0.57–1.86, p = 0.93) for S. aureus, 0.97 (95 % CI 0.51–1.85, p = 0.92) for CNS, 1.09 (95 % CI 0.56–2.12, p = 0.81) for streptococci, and 2.00 (95 % CI 0.77–5.21, p = 0.15) for coliforms.Fig. 3


Vaccination against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in two Swedish dairy herds.

Landin H, Mörk MJ, Larsson M, Waller KP - Acta Vet. Scand. (2015)

Presence of udder pathogens in vaccinated and not vaccinated cows. Proportions (%) of sampled cows having growth of different groups of udder pathogens (CNS coagulase-negative staphylococci) in 295 udder quarter milk samples from 232 cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis during the first 4 months after calving in vaccinated (vacc) and not vaccinated control (con) cows in herd A and B
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660610&req=5

Fig3: Presence of udder pathogens in vaccinated and not vaccinated cows. Proportions (%) of sampled cows having growth of different groups of udder pathogens (CNS coagulase-negative staphylococci) in 295 udder quarter milk samples from 232 cows with clinical or subclinical mastitis during the first 4 months after calving in vaccinated (vacc) and not vaccinated control (con) cows in herd A and B
Mentions: A total of 295 udder quarter samples from 232 cows (71 vaccinated and 51 control cows in herd A, and 49 vaccinated and 61 control cows in herd B) with CM or SCM were analyzed for bacterial growth. Of those 232 cows, 172 (74.1 %) had growth of S. aureus, CNS, streptococci or coliforms. The proportions of sampled cows with growth of different groups of udder pathogens divided by herd and treatment group are shown in Fig. 3. The probability of mastitis due to S. aureus, CNS, streptococci or coliforms did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The OR for the vaccinated group compared to the control group was 1.03 (95 % CI 0.57–1.86, p = 0.93) for S. aureus, 0.97 (95 % CI 0.51–1.85, p = 0.92) for CNS, 1.09 (95 % CI 0.56–2.12, p = 0.81) for streptococci, and 2.00 (95 % CI 0.77–5.21, p = 0.15) for coliforms.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: In herds where normal control measures are not successful, vaccination might be an additional tool to use if sufficiently efficient.Significant differences between vaccinated and control groups were not found in any of the parameters investigated.Vaccination with a commercial polyvalent vaccine did not have any beneficial effects on udder health, milk production or survival in two commercial dairy herds with mastitis problems due to S. aureus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Växa Sverige, SE-104 25, Stockholm, Sweden. hakan.landin@vxa.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a common udder pathogen in dairy cows, and may cause severe mastitis problems in some herds. In herds where normal control measures are not successful, vaccination might be an additional tool to use if sufficiently efficient. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available vaccine (Startvac(®), Hipra, Spain) in two commercial Swedish dairy herds where the control programs for S. aureus mastitis had been unsuccessful. Within each herd cows were randomly assigned to vaccine or control groups, and effects on udder health and milk production during 120 days after calving, and survival during the following lactation were evaluated.

Results: A field study was performed in two high producing Swedish herds having approximately 600 (herd A) and 200 (herd B) cows. During 12 months, cows with odd numbers were vaccinated three times around calving according to label protocol, while cows with even numbers constituted the not vaccinated control group. Quarter milk samples for bacteriological culturing were collected from all cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. The outcome was evaluated during 120 days after calving using data on SCC and daily milk yield at monthly milk recordings, and incidence of mastitis due to S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and coliforms. Cow survival throughout lactation was also studied. In herd A, 239 and 240 cows were included in the vaccinated and control groups, respectively. Corresponding numbers for herd B was 126 and 151 cows. Significant differences between vaccinated and control groups were not found in any of the parameters investigated.

Conclusions: Vaccination with a commercial polyvalent vaccine did not have any beneficial effects on udder health, milk production or survival in two commercial dairy herds with mastitis problems due to S. aureus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus