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Age-related changes in clinical parameters and their associations with common complex diseases.

Murakata Y, Fujimaki T, Yamada Y - Biomed Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The serum creatinine concentration and the estimated glomerular filtration rate increased or decreased linearly with age, respectively.Therefore, these results indicate that 13 clinical parameters, as well as the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and CKD, were significantly associated with age.They may therefore prove informative for the prevention of these diseases and contribute to the achievement of a healthy long life and successful aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan ; Department of Medical Genomics and Proteomics, Institute of Basic Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to clarify the age-related changes in 13 clinical parameters and their associations with common complex diseases. Study subjects comprised 6,027 community-dwelling individuals who were recruited to a population-based longitudinal genetic epidemiological study. Bonferroni's correction was applied to compensate for multiple comparisons of association and P<0.0011 was considered statistically significant. Body mass index and waist circumference increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in men, whereas the two parameters increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of obesity was highest (41.1%) in men aged 40-49 years, after which it decreased with age. The prevalence of obesity in women increased with age to ≤32.2% in those aged ≥70 years. Systolic and mean blood pressure (BP), as well as pulse pressure, increased linearly with age in all subjects, whereas diastolic BP increased with age up to ~60 years and subsequently decreased. The prevalence of hypertension increased with age to ≤69.9 or 68.5% at age ≥70 years in men and women, respectively. The fasting plasma glucose level, blood hemoglobin A1c content and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus increased gradually with age in men and women. The serum triglyceride concentration increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in men, whereas it increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia increased to a peak of 56.8% at age 50-59 years and subsequently decreased in men, whereas in women it increased with age to ≤34.9% at ≥70 years. The serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in women. The prevalence of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia increased gradually with age in women. The serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol increased with age up to ~50 years and subsequently declined in men, whereas it increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia increased with age to ≤53.4% at 50-59 years in men and ≤63.9% at 60-69 years in women and it decreased thereafter in the two genders. The serum creatinine concentration and the estimated glomerular filtration rate increased or decreased linearly with age, respectively. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) increased with age to ≤45.1 or 39.6% at ≥70 years in men and women, respectively. Therefore, these results indicate that 13 clinical parameters, as well as the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and CKD, were significantly associated with age. They may therefore prove informative for the prevention of these diseases and contribute to the achievement of a healthy long life and successful aging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration with age. Correlations were examined in longitudinal data for (A) all the subjects (28,005 measurements), for (B) men (15,627) and for (C) women (12,378). The line in each panel represents a least-squares plot of the data. (A) P=5.67×10−23, R2=0.0038, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=64.1478–0.0213x−0.0058 (x−52.4897)2; (B) P=0.0136, R2=0.0004, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=55.5027+0.0241x; (C) P=6.69×10−20, R2=0.0111, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=74.5306–0.0840x−0.0080 (x−52.4868)2. x, age (years).
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f9-br-0-0-505: Correlation of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration with age. Correlations were examined in longitudinal data for (A) all the subjects (28,005 measurements), for (B) men (15,627) and for (C) women (12,378). The line in each panel represents a least-squares plot of the data. (A) P=5.67×10−23, R2=0.0038, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=64.1478–0.0213x−0.0058 (x−52.4897)2; (B) P=0.0136, R2=0.0004, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=55.5027+0.0241x; (C) P=6.69×10−20, R2=0.0111, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=74.5306–0.0840x−0.0080 (x−52.4868)2. x, age (years).

Mentions: The serum concentration of HDL-cholesterol was significantly correlated with age for women, but not for men, in longitudinal data analysis (Fig. 9). Serum HDL-cholesterol increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in women (Fig. 9C). The R2 value for serum HDL-cholesterol was greater for women (0.0111) compared with men (0.0004). The prevalence of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia was significantly associated with age in women, but not in men, in the cross-sectional analysis (Fig. 10). In women, the prevalence of this condition increased gradually with age (Fig. 10D).


Age-related changes in clinical parameters and their associations with common complex diseases.

Murakata Y, Fujimaki T, Yamada Y - Biomed Rep (2015)

Correlation of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration with age. Correlations were examined in longitudinal data for (A) all the subjects (28,005 measurements), for (B) men (15,627) and for (C) women (12,378). The line in each panel represents a least-squares plot of the data. (A) P=5.67×10−23, R2=0.0038, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=64.1478–0.0213x−0.0058 (x−52.4897)2; (B) P=0.0136, R2=0.0004, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=55.5027+0.0241x; (C) P=6.69×10−20, R2=0.0111, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=74.5306–0.0840x−0.0080 (x−52.4868)2. x, age (years).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660591&req=5

f9-br-0-0-505: Correlation of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration with age. Correlations were examined in longitudinal data for (A) all the subjects (28,005 measurements), for (B) men (15,627) and for (C) women (12,378). The line in each panel represents a least-squares plot of the data. (A) P=5.67×10−23, R2=0.0038, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=64.1478–0.0213x−0.0058 (x−52.4897)2; (B) P=0.0136, R2=0.0004, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=55.5027+0.0241x; (C) P=6.69×10−20, R2=0.0111, serum HDL-cholesterol (mg/dl)=74.5306–0.0840x−0.0080 (x−52.4868)2. x, age (years).
Mentions: The serum concentration of HDL-cholesterol was significantly correlated with age for women, but not for men, in longitudinal data analysis (Fig. 9). Serum HDL-cholesterol increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in women (Fig. 9C). The R2 value for serum HDL-cholesterol was greater for women (0.0111) compared with men (0.0004). The prevalence of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia was significantly associated with age in women, but not in men, in the cross-sectional analysis (Fig. 10). In women, the prevalence of this condition increased gradually with age (Fig. 10D).

Bottom Line: The serum creatinine concentration and the estimated glomerular filtration rate increased or decreased linearly with age, respectively.Therefore, these results indicate that 13 clinical parameters, as well as the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and CKD, were significantly associated with age.They may therefore prove informative for the prevention of these diseases and contribute to the achievement of a healthy long life and successful aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan ; Department of Medical Genomics and Proteomics, Institute of Basic Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan.

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study was to clarify the age-related changes in 13 clinical parameters and their associations with common complex diseases. Study subjects comprised 6,027 community-dwelling individuals who were recruited to a population-based longitudinal genetic epidemiological study. Bonferroni's correction was applied to compensate for multiple comparisons of association and P<0.0011 was considered statistically significant. Body mass index and waist circumference increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in men, whereas the two parameters increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of obesity was highest (41.1%) in men aged 40-49 years, after which it decreased with age. The prevalence of obesity in women increased with age to ≤32.2% in those aged ≥70 years. Systolic and mean blood pressure (BP), as well as pulse pressure, increased linearly with age in all subjects, whereas diastolic BP increased with age up to ~60 years and subsequently decreased. The prevalence of hypertension increased with age to ≤69.9 or 68.5% at age ≥70 years in men and women, respectively. The fasting plasma glucose level, blood hemoglobin A1c content and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus increased gradually with age in men and women. The serum triglyceride concentration increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in men, whereas it increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia increased to a peak of 56.8% at age 50-59 years and subsequently decreased in men, whereas in women it increased with age to ≤34.9% at ≥70 years. The serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol concentration increased with age up to ~50 years and decreased thereafter in women. The prevalence of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia increased gradually with age in women. The serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol increased with age up to ~50 years and subsequently declined in men, whereas it increased linearly with age in women. The prevalence of hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia increased with age to ≤53.4% at 50-59 years in men and ≤63.9% at 60-69 years in women and it decreased thereafter in the two genders. The serum creatinine concentration and the estimated glomerular filtration rate increased or decreased linearly with age, respectively. The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) increased with age to ≤45.1 or 39.6% at ≥70 years in men and women, respectively. Therefore, these results indicate that 13 clinical parameters, as well as the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and CKD, were significantly associated with age. They may therefore prove informative for the prevention of these diseases and contribute to the achievement of a healthy long life and successful aging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus