Limits...
Vulvar invasive squamous cell carcinoma in a young patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-seropositivity.

Rao TS, Bellam SS, Gurupuprasad P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jul-Dec)

Bottom Line: Vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are rare malignancy of unknown etiology.The occurrence of invasive vulvar SCC in a younger patient is rare.In this patient, it is most likely precipitated by immunodeficiency caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of DVL, Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are rare malignancy of unknown etiology. Only 10% of these tumors occur under the age of 40 years. We are describing one such rare case where a 29-year-old female patient had presented with nonhealing ulcer over vulva since 4 months. Histopathology revealed invasive SCC of the vulva. The occurrence of invasive vulvar SCC in a younger patient is rare. In this patient, it is most likely precipitated by immunodeficiency caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Closer view of the verrucous growth
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660568&req=5

Figure 1: Closer view of the verrucous growth

Mentions: A 29-year-old female patient presented to the dermatology department with a nonhealing ulcer on the vulva of 4 months duration. It was associated with severe itching and burning sensation. She also complained of loss of weight over 10 kg over 3 months. Her medical history revealed that she was a housewife married for 6 years with no extramarital exposure. The patient's known HIV-risk factor was her husband, who was reportedly HIV-positive. Physical examination revealed a moderately built women with an erythematous verrucous indurated growth measuring about 2 cm × 1 cm over the right side of labia majora, covered with dirty grayish-white precipitate [Figure 1]. There was no enlargement of lymph nodes and on careful examination rest of vagina and cervix were normal. Onychomycosis of fingernails and toenails were seen. CD4 count is 216 cells/mm 3 pap smear was normal and colposcopic examination of cervix and vagina were normal. Histopathology of the lesion from labia majora revealed focally invasive moderately differentiated SCC [Figures 2 and 3]. Her chest X-ray was found to be normal and computed tomography-abdomen revealed ill-defined soft tissue lesion in the vaginal region. Laboratory studies confirmed HIV. The patient was put on tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The patient was in stage1 vulvar cancer, and she underwent modified radical vulvectomy with primary closure [Figure 4]. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and no recurrence was seen over a follow-up period of 9 months.


Vulvar invasive squamous cell carcinoma in a young patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-seropositivity.

Rao TS, Bellam SS, Gurupuprasad P - Indian J Sex Transm Dis (2015 Jul-Dec)

Closer view of the verrucous growth
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660568&req=5

Figure 1: Closer view of the verrucous growth
Mentions: A 29-year-old female patient presented to the dermatology department with a nonhealing ulcer on the vulva of 4 months duration. It was associated with severe itching and burning sensation. She also complained of loss of weight over 10 kg over 3 months. Her medical history revealed that she was a housewife married for 6 years with no extramarital exposure. The patient's known HIV-risk factor was her husband, who was reportedly HIV-positive. Physical examination revealed a moderately built women with an erythematous verrucous indurated growth measuring about 2 cm × 1 cm over the right side of labia majora, covered with dirty grayish-white precipitate [Figure 1]. There was no enlargement of lymph nodes and on careful examination rest of vagina and cervix were normal. Onychomycosis of fingernails and toenails were seen. CD4 count is 216 cells/mm 3 pap smear was normal and colposcopic examination of cervix and vagina were normal. Histopathology of the lesion from labia majora revealed focally invasive moderately differentiated SCC [Figures 2 and 3]. Her chest X-ray was found to be normal and computed tomography-abdomen revealed ill-defined soft tissue lesion in the vaginal region. Laboratory studies confirmed HIV. The patient was put on tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The patient was in stage1 vulvar cancer, and she underwent modified radical vulvectomy with primary closure [Figure 4]. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and no recurrence was seen over a follow-up period of 9 months.

Bottom Line: Vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are rare malignancy of unknown etiology.The occurrence of invasive vulvar SCC in a younger patient is rare.In this patient, it is most likely precipitated by immunodeficiency caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of DVL, Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
Vulvar squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are rare malignancy of unknown etiology. Only 10% of these tumors occur under the age of 40 years. We are describing one such rare case where a 29-year-old female patient had presented with nonhealing ulcer over vulva since 4 months. Histopathology revealed invasive SCC of the vulva. The occurrence of invasive vulvar SCC in a younger patient is rare. In this patient, it is most likely precipitated by immunodeficiency caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus