Limits...
Cervical spine surgery in patients with diastrophic dysplasia: Case report with long-term follow-up.

Jasiewicz B, Potaczek T, Duda S, Tęsiorowski M - J Craniovertebr Junction Spine (2015 Oct-Dec)

Bottom Line: The effects of the correction remained stable for respectively 6 and 10 years of the follow-up period.The unique follow-up confirms that this type of intervention leads to an effective and long lasting results.Significant cervical kyphosis in patients suffering from DTD may be treated surgically using anterior approach even in young children with a favorable and lasting results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Zakopane, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Cervical kyphosis in diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a very dangerous deformity which may lead to compression of neural structures resulting in tetraplegia or even. Treatment of this deformity is usually surgical, but no long-term follow-up studies are presented in the literature. Authors present a case of two children with DTD who underwent anterior corpectomy due to severe cervical kyphosis. The kyphotic deformity was corrected and the normal spinal canal width was restored. The effects of the correction remained stable for respectively 6 and 10 years of the follow-up period. The unique follow-up confirms that this type of intervention leads to an effective and long lasting results. Significant cervical kyphosis in patients suffering from DTD may be treated surgically using anterior approach even in young children with a favorable and lasting results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Case 2, female. Solid fusion at C4-C6 is visible. The lower adjacent segment shows signs of degeneration
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660502&req=5

Figure 3: Case 2, female. Solid fusion at C4-C6 is visible. The lower adjacent segment shows signs of degeneration

Mentions: The patient, Caucasian female, was admitted to the hospital at the age of five due to balance disturbances, dizziness, and episodes of fainting resulting from neck motion. The clinical picture was typical for DTD. Cervical radiograms showed an anterior C4/C5 dislocation. Cervical lordosis was 32°, but segmental C4/C5 kyphosis was 52°. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed other anomalies: Deformation of the dens, cleft in the C3 and C4 vertebrae. Doppler ultrasound of the carotid arteries presented an impaired blood flow during neck motion. Flexion/extension cervical films showed hypermobility at the level of dislocation. The patient underwent C5 corpectomy with reposition of the dislocation, reconstruction with iliac autograft and anterior fixation with plate. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were noted. The soft collar was utilised for 6 weeks. Postoperatively, the C4/C5 angle equalled 7° of lordosis, and the entire cervical lordosis angle was 37°. Clinical symptoms resolved. Six years postoperation the deformity was stable, with 9° of C4/C5 lordosis and 45° of cervical lordosis. A solid fusion at C4-C6 was present although the lower adjacent segment showed signs of degeneration [Figure 3]. Further surgery was performed for scoliosis and foot deformity.


Cervical spine surgery in patients with diastrophic dysplasia: Case report with long-term follow-up.

Jasiewicz B, Potaczek T, Duda S, Tęsiorowski M - J Craniovertebr Junction Spine (2015 Oct-Dec)

Case 2, female. Solid fusion at C4-C6 is visible. The lower adjacent segment shows signs of degeneration
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660502&req=5

Figure 3: Case 2, female. Solid fusion at C4-C6 is visible. The lower adjacent segment shows signs of degeneration
Mentions: The patient, Caucasian female, was admitted to the hospital at the age of five due to balance disturbances, dizziness, and episodes of fainting resulting from neck motion. The clinical picture was typical for DTD. Cervical radiograms showed an anterior C4/C5 dislocation. Cervical lordosis was 32°, but segmental C4/C5 kyphosis was 52°. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed other anomalies: Deformation of the dens, cleft in the C3 and C4 vertebrae. Doppler ultrasound of the carotid arteries presented an impaired blood flow during neck motion. Flexion/extension cervical films showed hypermobility at the level of dislocation. The patient underwent C5 corpectomy with reposition of the dislocation, reconstruction with iliac autograft and anterior fixation with plate. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were noted. The soft collar was utilised for 6 weeks. Postoperatively, the C4/C5 angle equalled 7° of lordosis, and the entire cervical lordosis angle was 37°. Clinical symptoms resolved. Six years postoperation the deformity was stable, with 9° of C4/C5 lordosis and 45° of cervical lordosis. A solid fusion at C4-C6 was present although the lower adjacent segment showed signs of degeneration [Figure 3]. Further surgery was performed for scoliosis and foot deformity.

Bottom Line: The effects of the correction remained stable for respectively 6 and 10 years of the follow-up period.The unique follow-up confirms that this type of intervention leads to an effective and long lasting results.Significant cervical kyphosis in patients suffering from DTD may be treated surgically using anterior approach even in young children with a favorable and lasting results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Jagiellonian University, Zakopane, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Cervical kyphosis in diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a very dangerous deformity which may lead to compression of neural structures resulting in tetraplegia or even. Treatment of this deformity is usually surgical, but no long-term follow-up studies are presented in the literature. Authors present a case of two children with DTD who underwent anterior corpectomy due to severe cervical kyphosis. The kyphotic deformity was corrected and the normal spinal canal width was restored. The effects of the correction remained stable for respectively 6 and 10 years of the follow-up period. The unique follow-up confirms that this type of intervention leads to an effective and long lasting results. Significant cervical kyphosis in patients suffering from DTD may be treated surgically using anterior approach even in young children with a favorable and lasting results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus