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Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

Nogi M, Karakawa M, Komoda N, Yagyu H, Nge TT - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer.The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires.Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Silver nanowires were buried in the PVA substrate (left: top view, right: side view). (b) Silver nanowires were deposited on the transparent nanofiber paper, and were entangled with the cellulose nanofibers (left: top view, right: side view). (c) Electrical resistance of transparent silver nanowires on a PET film (black), a PVA film (blue), and transparent nanofiber paper (red), as a function of the number of folding cycles, performed in zero-span roll-tests.
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f2: (a) Silver nanowires were buried in the PVA substrate (left: top view, right: side view). (b) Silver nanowires were deposited on the transparent nanofiber paper, and were entangled with the cellulose nanofibers (left: top view, right: side view). (c) Electrical resistance of transparent silver nanowires on a PET film (black), a PVA film (blue), and transparent nanofiber paper (red), as a function of the number of folding cycles, performed in zero-span roll-tests.

Mentions: (1) Heating method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/ethanol suspension was bar-coated onto the transparent nanofiber paper, and then air-dried for 3–5 min. The air-dried silver nanowires on the nanofiber papers were heated at 150 °C for 30 min in air. (2) Mechanical pressing method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/ethanol suspension was bar-coated onto the transparent nanofiber papers, and was then air-dried for 3–5 min. The air-dried silver nanowire networks on the nanofiber papers were mechanically pressed at 2 MPa and 20 °C for 20 s. Using a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film as a transparent substrate, as shown in Fig. 2c, air-dried silver nanowire networks were pressed at 10 MPa and 20 °C for 20 s. (3) Dropping method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/water suspension was cast on a silicon wafer, and then air-dried. A 0.7 wt.% cellulose nanofiber/water dispersion was cast over the dried silver nanowire layer on a silicon wafer, and then air-dried at 50 °C for 12–24 hours. After drying, the nanofiber paper was removed from the silicon wafer. The obtained optically transparent nanofiber paper with a silver nanowire layer was 15–20 μm thick.


Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

Nogi M, Karakawa M, Komoda N, Yagyu H, Nge TT - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Silver nanowires were buried in the PVA substrate (left: top view, right: side view). (b) Silver nanowires were deposited on the transparent nanofiber paper, and were entangled with the cellulose nanofibers (left: top view, right: side view). (c) Electrical resistance of transparent silver nanowires on a PET film (black), a PVA film (blue), and transparent nanofiber paper (red), as a function of the number of folding cycles, performed in zero-span roll-tests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660464&req=5

f2: (a) Silver nanowires were buried in the PVA substrate (left: top view, right: side view). (b) Silver nanowires were deposited on the transparent nanofiber paper, and were entangled with the cellulose nanofibers (left: top view, right: side view). (c) Electrical resistance of transparent silver nanowires on a PET film (black), a PVA film (blue), and transparent nanofiber paper (red), as a function of the number of folding cycles, performed in zero-span roll-tests.
Mentions: (1) Heating method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/ethanol suspension was bar-coated onto the transparent nanofiber paper, and then air-dried for 3–5 min. The air-dried silver nanowires on the nanofiber papers were heated at 150 °C for 30 min in air. (2) Mechanical pressing method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/ethanol suspension was bar-coated onto the transparent nanofiber papers, and was then air-dried for 3–5 min. The air-dried silver nanowire networks on the nanofiber papers were mechanically pressed at 2 MPa and 20 °C for 20 s. Using a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film as a transparent substrate, as shown in Fig. 2c, air-dried silver nanowire networks were pressed at 10 MPa and 20 °C for 20 s. (3) Dropping method (Fig. 1d): A 0.3 wt.% silver nanowire/water suspension was cast on a silicon wafer, and then air-dried. A 0.7 wt.% cellulose nanofiber/water dispersion was cast over the dried silver nanowire layer on a silicon wafer, and then air-dried at 50 °C for 12–24 hours. After drying, the nanofiber paper was removed from the silicon wafer. The obtained optically transparent nanofiber paper with a silver nanowire layer was 15–20 μm thick.

Bottom Line: The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer.The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires.Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus