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Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates.

Yoo D, Johnson TW, Cherukulappurath S, Norris DJ, Oh SH - ACS Nano (2015)

Bottom Line: The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate.As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens.These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States.

ABSTRACT
We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stretchable gold nanohole arrays on a PDMS film. (a) Schematic of the fabrication process. (b) Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a gold nanohole array template-stripped using a PDMS backing layer. Scale bar: 1 μm. Inset: Zoomed-in SEM of the nanohole array (150 nm hole diameter and 500 nm period). (c) Measured optical transmission spectra from a nanohole array stretched along the x axis and illuminated with x-polarized light. The unstretched nanohole array exhibits two main resonance peaks: the (1,1) Bragg resonance at 635 nm and the (1,0) resonance at 777 nm. After stretching in the x direction, the (1,0) resonance in the x-polarization red-shifts while its intensity decreases. (d) Transmission spectra for the nanohole array on PDMS stretched along the x axis with illumination with y-polarized light. In this case, the (0,1) peak shifts to shorter wavelengths and its intensity increases.
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fig1: Stretchable gold nanohole arrays on a PDMS film. (a) Schematic of the fabrication process. (b) Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a gold nanohole array template-stripped using a PDMS backing layer. Scale bar: 1 μm. Inset: Zoomed-in SEM of the nanohole array (150 nm hole diameter and 500 nm period). (c) Measured optical transmission spectra from a nanohole array stretched along the x axis and illuminated with x-polarized light. The unstretched nanohole array exhibits two main resonance peaks: the (1,1) Bragg resonance at 635 nm and the (1,0) resonance at 777 nm. After stretching in the x direction, the (1,0) resonance in the x-polarization red-shifts while its intensity decreases. (d) Transmission spectra for the nanohole array on PDMS stretched along the x axis with illumination with y-polarized light. In this case, the (0,1) peak shifts to shorter wavelengths and its intensity increases.

Mentions: Our fabrication scheme is illustrated in Figure 1a. First, a Si template is produced by creating a 2D array of deep circular holes (180 nm diameter and 500 nm periodicity) in a Si wafer using nanoimprint lithography (Nanonex, NX-B200) and reactive ion etching (STS, 320PC). Then a 200 nm-thick Au film is deposited on the Si template through a shadow mask with an open area of 10 mm × 10 mm. During the metal evaporation process, nanoholes are formed in the deposited Au film.


Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates.

Yoo D, Johnson TW, Cherukulappurath S, Norris DJ, Oh SH - ACS Nano (2015)

Stretchable gold nanohole arrays on a PDMS film. (a) Schematic of the fabrication process. (b) Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a gold nanohole array template-stripped using a PDMS backing layer. Scale bar: 1 μm. Inset: Zoomed-in SEM of the nanohole array (150 nm hole diameter and 500 nm period). (c) Measured optical transmission spectra from a nanohole array stretched along the x axis and illuminated with x-polarized light. The unstretched nanohole array exhibits two main resonance peaks: the (1,1) Bragg resonance at 635 nm and the (1,0) resonance at 777 nm. After stretching in the x direction, the (1,0) resonance in the x-polarization red-shifts while its intensity decreases. (d) Transmission spectra for the nanohole array on PDMS stretched along the x axis with illumination with y-polarized light. In this case, the (0,1) peak shifts to shorter wavelengths and its intensity increases.
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fig1: Stretchable gold nanohole arrays on a PDMS film. (a) Schematic of the fabrication process. (b) Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a gold nanohole array template-stripped using a PDMS backing layer. Scale bar: 1 μm. Inset: Zoomed-in SEM of the nanohole array (150 nm hole diameter and 500 nm period). (c) Measured optical transmission spectra from a nanohole array stretched along the x axis and illuminated with x-polarized light. The unstretched nanohole array exhibits two main resonance peaks: the (1,1) Bragg resonance at 635 nm and the (1,0) resonance at 777 nm. After stretching in the x direction, the (1,0) resonance in the x-polarization red-shifts while its intensity decreases. (d) Transmission spectra for the nanohole array on PDMS stretched along the x axis with illumination with y-polarized light. In this case, the (0,1) peak shifts to shorter wavelengths and its intensity increases.
Mentions: Our fabrication scheme is illustrated in Figure 1a. First, a Si template is produced by creating a 2D array of deep circular holes (180 nm diameter and 500 nm periodicity) in a Si wafer using nanoimprint lithography (Nanonex, NX-B200) and reactive ion etching (STS, 320PC). Then a 200 nm-thick Au film is deposited on the Si template through a shadow mask with an open area of 10 mm × 10 mm. During the metal evaporation process, nanoholes are formed in the deposited Au film.

Bottom Line: The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate.As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens.These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States.

ABSTRACT
We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus