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Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing.

Xue J, Zhou ZK, Wei Z, Su R, Lai J, Li J, Li C, Zhang T, Wang XH - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications.Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber.This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes.(a) Camera picture of full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes. These palettes were achieved by implementing te differing from 0 to 138.5 min (Supplementary Table 2) on a CTPM–PBA panel with an original reflective peak at 692 nm under the incident angle of 8°. The samples are all about 3 × 3 mm2. To achieve these sub-pieces, the original AAO template is cut into sub-pieces by scissor before etching, which causes fluctuation of these samples that is then flattened using glasses. (b) Corresponding positions of part of samples in a plotted in the CIE 1931 colour space. The dots appeared as a circle, confirming the capability for achieving full colour using the CTPM–PBA panels. (c) Reflection spectra of the three samples marked with squares in a, displaying colours of blue, green and red, respectively.
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f3: Full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes.(a) Camera picture of full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes. These palettes were achieved by implementing te differing from 0 to 138.5 min (Supplementary Table 2) on a CTPM–PBA panel with an original reflective peak at 692 nm under the incident angle of 8°. The samples are all about 3 × 3 mm2. To achieve these sub-pieces, the original AAO template is cut into sub-pieces by scissor before etching, which causes fluctuation of these samples that is then flattened using glasses. (b) Corresponding positions of part of samples in a plotted in the CIE 1931 colour space. The dots appeared as a circle, confirming the capability for achieving full colour using the CTPM–PBA panels. (c) Reflection spectra of the three samples marked with squares in a, displaying colours of blue, green and red, respectively.

Mentions: The results from the CTPM–PBA palettes in full colour generation are shown in Fig. 3. A large piece of AAO template with a main reflective peak of about 692 nm at an incident angle of 8° was divided into 36 sub-pieces. The small pieces were then etched using diluted acid with different etching times to obtain different reflection spectra. Next, all the treated AAO templates were placed into the sputtering chamber. A layer of Al was sputtered onto them, bringing about colours ranging from red to blue. When plotting the positions of a portion of these colours in the CIE 1931 colour space, they appeared on a circle, confirming the realization of full colours in the Al CTPM–PBA palettes from the same original piece of AAO template (Fig. 3b). Taken as examples, the reflection spectra of the three sub-pieces of these palettes (marked in Fig. 3a) are shown in Fig. 3c, in which reflective peaks at 620, 528 and 472 nm correspond to red, green and blue colours, respectively. Also, we found some of the sub-pieces exhibited intensity changes in the colour display. This fact can be attributed to the damages caused by AAO template cutting, and can be effectively avoided in further applications that do not require such sample cutting.


Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing.

Xue J, Zhou ZK, Wei Z, Su R, Lai J, Li J, Li C, Zhang T, Wang XH - Nat Commun (2015)

Full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes.(a) Camera picture of full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes. These palettes were achieved by implementing te differing from 0 to 138.5 min (Supplementary Table 2) on a CTPM–PBA panel with an original reflective peak at 692 nm under the incident angle of 8°. The samples are all about 3 × 3 mm2. To achieve these sub-pieces, the original AAO template is cut into sub-pieces by scissor before etching, which causes fluctuation of these samples that is then flattened using glasses. (b) Corresponding positions of part of samples in a plotted in the CIE 1931 colour space. The dots appeared as a circle, confirming the capability for achieving full colour using the CTPM–PBA panels. (c) Reflection spectra of the three samples marked with squares in a, displaying colours of blue, green and red, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660354&req=5

f3: Full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes.(a) Camera picture of full-colour Al CTPM–PBA palettes. These palettes were achieved by implementing te differing from 0 to 138.5 min (Supplementary Table 2) on a CTPM–PBA panel with an original reflective peak at 692 nm under the incident angle of 8°. The samples are all about 3 × 3 mm2. To achieve these sub-pieces, the original AAO template is cut into sub-pieces by scissor before etching, which causes fluctuation of these samples that is then flattened using glasses. (b) Corresponding positions of part of samples in a plotted in the CIE 1931 colour space. The dots appeared as a circle, confirming the capability for achieving full colour using the CTPM–PBA panels. (c) Reflection spectra of the three samples marked with squares in a, displaying colours of blue, green and red, respectively.
Mentions: The results from the CTPM–PBA palettes in full colour generation are shown in Fig. 3. A large piece of AAO template with a main reflective peak of about 692 nm at an incident angle of 8° was divided into 36 sub-pieces. The small pieces were then etched using diluted acid with different etching times to obtain different reflection spectra. Next, all the treated AAO templates were placed into the sputtering chamber. A layer of Al was sputtered onto them, bringing about colours ranging from red to blue. When plotting the positions of a portion of these colours in the CIE 1931 colour space, they appeared on a circle, confirming the realization of full colours in the Al CTPM–PBA palettes from the same original piece of AAO template (Fig. 3b). Taken as examples, the reflection spectra of the three sub-pieces of these palettes (marked in Fig. 3a) are shown in Fig. 3c, in which reflective peaks at 620, 528 and 472 nm correspond to red, green and blue colours, respectively. Also, we found some of the sub-pieces exhibited intensity changes in the colour display. This fact can be attributed to the damages caused by AAO template cutting, and can be effectively avoided in further applications that do not require such sample cutting.

Bottom Line: However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications.Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber.This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus