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Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing.

Xue J, Zhou ZK, Wei Z, Su R, Lai J, Li J, Li C, Zhang T, Wang XH - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications.Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber.This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CTPM–PBA colour on porous structure.(a) 3D schematic overview of an AAO supported CTPM–PBA colour panel. The top layer is a PBA layer, the middle an AAO template, and the bottom an Al substrate. Light of specific colour is reflected in the case of white light incidence. (b) Measured reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA colour panels with different Ag sputtering time, ts. Top inserts are pictures of the corresponding samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2. The bottom-right insert is the SEM morphology of the sample e (ta=20 nm) observed at a tilted angle of 45°. Scale bar, 200 nm. (c) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels with different AAO thickness, d. Samples with longer tg have larger d, resulting in redshift of reflective spectra. (d) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels (d=480 nm) with different porosity, P. Longer te result in bigger P, so as to small average refractive index, corresponding to reflective peak on the blue side. (e) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panel (d=480 nm, P=37%) in different circumstances. Inserts in c, d and e are corresponding to camera pictures of the measured samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2.
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f2: CTPM–PBA colour on porous structure.(a) 3D schematic overview of an AAO supported CTPM–PBA colour panel. The top layer is a PBA layer, the middle an AAO template, and the bottom an Al substrate. Light of specific colour is reflected in the case of white light incidence. (b) Measured reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA colour panels with different Ag sputtering time, ts. Top inserts are pictures of the corresponding samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2. The bottom-right insert is the SEM morphology of the sample e (ta=20 nm) observed at a tilted angle of 45°. Scale bar, 200 nm. (c) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels with different AAO thickness, d. Samples with longer tg have larger d, resulting in redshift of reflective spectra. (d) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels (d=480 nm) with different porosity, P. Longer te result in bigger P, so as to small average refractive index, corresponding to reflective peak on the blue side. (e) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panel (d=480 nm, P=37%) in different circumstances. Inserts in c, d and e are corresponding to camera pictures of the measured samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2.

Mentions: As manifested above, using the CTPM–PBA approach, we successfully achieved large p–v ratios and narrow reflective peaks to realize the vivid colour display that is the basic of the full-colour plasmonic printing, which is lacking in previous colour-generation works based on the reflective metal–dielectric–metal (MDM) structures282930. The reason lies in two notable advances made in our work: (i) we presented the CTPM to design the thicknesses of the dielectric layer and the top metal layer for high colour saturation by maximizing the reflective p–v ratio, while in previous works, the dielectric layer was designed as the Fabry–Perot resonator using the standing wave theory in which, at the targeted wavelength, the interference of the reflective wave at the inner interface of the thin metal layer is the DI, rather than the CI required by the CTPM. This condition of the CTPM is the reason for a remarkable blue-shift between the reflective valleys with the metal layer and without such layer (corresponding to the standing wave in dielectric layer) (Fig. 2b, Supplementary Fig. 4). In addition, the standing wave theory cannot guide the design of the top metal layer. (ii) More importantly, instead of the normal metal film in the MDM structures reported in previous works, the metal island film is introduced as the PBA to significantly sharpen the reflective peaks and give rise to a vivid colour output in the full-colour range, which is not feasible with previous MDM structures.


Scalable, full-colour and controllable chromotropic plasmonic printing.

Xue J, Zhou ZK, Wei Z, Su R, Lai J, Li J, Li C, Zhang T, Wang XH - Nat Commun (2015)

CTPM–PBA colour on porous structure.(a) 3D schematic overview of an AAO supported CTPM–PBA colour panel. The top layer is a PBA layer, the middle an AAO template, and the bottom an Al substrate. Light of specific colour is reflected in the case of white light incidence. (b) Measured reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA colour panels with different Ag sputtering time, ts. Top inserts are pictures of the corresponding samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2. The bottom-right insert is the SEM morphology of the sample e (ta=20 nm) observed at a tilted angle of 45°. Scale bar, 200 nm. (c) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels with different AAO thickness, d. Samples with longer tg have larger d, resulting in redshift of reflective spectra. (d) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels (d=480 nm) with different porosity, P. Longer te result in bigger P, so as to small average refractive index, corresponding to reflective peak on the blue side. (e) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panel (d=480 nm, P=37%) in different circumstances. Inserts in c, d and e are corresponding to camera pictures of the measured samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660354&req=5

f2: CTPM–PBA colour on porous structure.(a) 3D schematic overview of an AAO supported CTPM–PBA colour panel. The top layer is a PBA layer, the middle an AAO template, and the bottom an Al substrate. Light of specific colour is reflected in the case of white light incidence. (b) Measured reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA colour panels with different Ag sputtering time, ts. Top inserts are pictures of the corresponding samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2. The bottom-right insert is the SEM morphology of the sample e (ta=20 nm) observed at a tilted angle of 45°. Scale bar, 200 nm. (c) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels with different AAO thickness, d. Samples with longer tg have larger d, resulting in redshift of reflective spectra. (d) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panels (d=480 nm) with different porosity, P. Longer te result in bigger P, so as to small average refractive index, corresponding to reflective peak on the blue side. (e) Reflective spectra of CTPM–PBA panel (d=480 nm, P=37%) in different circumstances. Inserts in c, d and e are corresponding to camera pictures of the measured samples. All the samples are about 4 × 4 mm2.
Mentions: As manifested above, using the CTPM–PBA approach, we successfully achieved large p–v ratios and narrow reflective peaks to realize the vivid colour display that is the basic of the full-colour plasmonic printing, which is lacking in previous colour-generation works based on the reflective metal–dielectric–metal (MDM) structures282930. The reason lies in two notable advances made in our work: (i) we presented the CTPM to design the thicknesses of the dielectric layer and the top metal layer for high colour saturation by maximizing the reflective p–v ratio, while in previous works, the dielectric layer was designed as the Fabry–Perot resonator using the standing wave theory in which, at the targeted wavelength, the interference of the reflective wave at the inner interface of the thin metal layer is the DI, rather than the CI required by the CTPM. This condition of the CTPM is the reason for a remarkable blue-shift between the reflective valleys with the metal layer and without such layer (corresponding to the standing wave in dielectric layer) (Fig. 2b, Supplementary Fig. 4). In addition, the standing wave theory cannot guide the design of the top metal layer. (ii) More importantly, instead of the normal metal film in the MDM structures reported in previous works, the metal island film is introduced as the PBA to significantly sharpen the reflective peaks and give rise to a vivid colour output in the full-colour range, which is not feasible with previous MDM structures.

Bottom Line: However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications.Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber.This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Plasmonic colour printing has drawn wide attention as a promising candidate for the next-generation colour-printing technology. However, an efficient approach to realize full colour and scalable fabrication is still lacking, which prevents plasmonic colour printing from practical applications. Here we present a scalable and full-colour plasmonic printing approach by combining conjugate twin-phase modulation with a plasmonic broadband absorber. More importantly, our approach also demonstrates controllable chromotropic capability, that is, the ability of reversible colour transformations. This chromotropic capability affords enormous potentials in building functionalized prints for anticounterfeiting, special label, and high-density data encryption storage. With such excellent performances in functional colour applications, this colour-printing approach could pave the way for plasmonic colour printing in real-world commercial utilization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus