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The impact of temperature on microbial diversity and AOA activity in the Tengchong Geothermal Field, China.

Li H, Yang Q, Li J, Gao H, Li P, Zhou H - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that Bacteria and Archaea abundance changed markedly with temperature changes and that the number of cells was lowest at high temperatures (90.8 °C).Additionally, a positive correlation between Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) activity and temperature was detected.AOA activity increased from 17 to 52 pmol of NO2(-) per cell d(-1) with a temperature change from 50 to 70 °C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Sciences and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China.

ABSTRACT
Using a culture-independent method that combines CARD-FISH, qPCR and 16S rDNA, we investigated the abundance, community structure and diversity of microbes along a steep thermal gradient (50-90 °C) in the Tengchong Geothermal Field. We found that Bacteria and Archaea abundance changed markedly with temperature changes and that the number of cells was lowest at high temperatures (90.8 °C). Under low-temperature conditions (52.3-74.6 °C), the microbial communities were dominated by Bacteria, which accounted for 60-80% of the total number of cells. At 74.6 °C, Archaea were dominant, and at 90.8 °C, they accounted for more than 90% of the total number of cells. Additionally, the microbial communities at high temperatures (74.6-90.8 °C) were substantially simpler than those at the low-temperature sites. Only a few genera (e.g., bacterial Caldisericum, Thermotoga and Thermoanaerobacter, archaeal Vulcanisaeta and Hyperthermus) often dominated in high-temperature environments. Additionally, a positive correlation between Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) activity and temperature was detected. AOA activity increased from 17 to 52 pmol of NO2(-) per cell d(-1) with a temperature change from 50 to 70 °C.

No MeSH data available.


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Activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in medium with different temperatures.
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f6: Activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in medium with different temperatures.

Mentions: We set five temperatures (50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 °C) to cultivate ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms for 15–20 days under dark aerobic conditions. Microscopic examination revealed the microorganism populations present after cultivation in enrichment media (Fig. 5A,B). The ammonia-oxidizing activity of the microorganisms was determined based on nitrite production. All experiments were performed in triplicates and the reported values are average values from triplicates. Nitrite production was not observed in uninoculated media or at temperatures higher than 80 °C. The maximum cell numbers ranged from 1.35 × 107 to 1.56 × 107/mL across the different temperatures (Fig. 6). The oxidation rates of ammonia to nitrite corresponded with an increasing abundance of cells. Calculations of ammonia oxidation activity were based on the reported total number of cells and nitrite production in enrichment media22. The different temperature had somewhat influence on cell growth and activity. At a low temperature (50 °C), the ammonia oxidizing activity was low, at 17 pmol of NO2− per cell per d. By contrast, at a higher temperature (70 °C), the activity was the highest observed, generating 52 pmol of NO2− per cell per d (Fig. 6).


The impact of temperature on microbial diversity and AOA activity in the Tengchong Geothermal Field, China.

Li H, Yang Q, Li J, Gao H, Li P, Zhou H - Sci Rep (2015)

Activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in medium with different temperatures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660298&req=5

f6: Activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in medium with different temperatures.
Mentions: We set five temperatures (50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 °C) to cultivate ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms for 15–20 days under dark aerobic conditions. Microscopic examination revealed the microorganism populations present after cultivation in enrichment media (Fig. 5A,B). The ammonia-oxidizing activity of the microorganisms was determined based on nitrite production. All experiments were performed in triplicates and the reported values are average values from triplicates. Nitrite production was not observed in uninoculated media or at temperatures higher than 80 °C. The maximum cell numbers ranged from 1.35 × 107 to 1.56 × 107/mL across the different temperatures (Fig. 6). The oxidation rates of ammonia to nitrite corresponded with an increasing abundance of cells. Calculations of ammonia oxidation activity were based on the reported total number of cells and nitrite production in enrichment media22. The different temperature had somewhat influence on cell growth and activity. At a low temperature (50 °C), the ammonia oxidizing activity was low, at 17 pmol of NO2− per cell per d. By contrast, at a higher temperature (70 °C), the activity was the highest observed, generating 52 pmol of NO2− per cell per d (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: We found that Bacteria and Archaea abundance changed markedly with temperature changes and that the number of cells was lowest at high temperatures (90.8 °C).Additionally, a positive correlation between Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) activity and temperature was detected.AOA activity increased from 17 to 52 pmol of NO2(-) per cell d(-1) with a temperature change from 50 to 70 °C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Sciences and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China.

ABSTRACT
Using a culture-independent method that combines CARD-FISH, qPCR and 16S rDNA, we investigated the abundance, community structure and diversity of microbes along a steep thermal gradient (50-90 °C) in the Tengchong Geothermal Field. We found that Bacteria and Archaea abundance changed markedly with temperature changes and that the number of cells was lowest at high temperatures (90.8 °C). Under low-temperature conditions (52.3-74.6 °C), the microbial communities were dominated by Bacteria, which accounted for 60-80% of the total number of cells. At 74.6 °C, Archaea were dominant, and at 90.8 °C, they accounted for more than 90% of the total number of cells. Additionally, the microbial communities at high temperatures (74.6-90.8 °C) were substantially simpler than those at the low-temperature sites. Only a few genera (e.g., bacterial Caldisericum, Thermotoga and Thermoanaerobacter, archaeal Vulcanisaeta and Hyperthermus) often dominated in high-temperature environments. Additionally, a positive correlation between Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) activity and temperature was detected. AOA activity increased from 17 to 52 pmol of NO2(-) per cell d(-1) with a temperature change from 50 to 70 °C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus