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White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

Johnson CP, Juranek J, Swank PR, Kramer L, Cox CS, Ewing-Cobbs L - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Bottom Line: Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle.Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding.Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Hawaii at Hilo, Department of Psychology, 200 W Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720, United States.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

TBSS Results. White matter skeleton appears in green. The cingulum bundle (pink), superior longitudinal fasciculus (blue), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (yellow) regions from the Johns Hopkins University atlas are illustrated. Clusters where OI group FA is significantly greater than the TBI group (p < 0.05, multiple comparison correction) appear red. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
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f0005: TBSS Results. White matter skeleton appears in green. The cingulum bundle (pink), superior longitudinal fasciculus (blue), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (yellow) regions from the Johns Hopkins University atlas are illustrated. Clusters where OI group FA is significantly greater than the TBI group (p < 0.05, multiple comparison correction) appear red. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

Mentions: Probabilistic tracts derived from the Johns Hopkins University white-matter tractography atlas were overlaid onto each brain and masks were derived by thresholding the probability of white matter paths at FA values of 0.2 and then applied to the FA skeleton and summarized to generate FA and MD values for each of the tracts of interest in the left hemisphere (Hua et al., 2008; see Fig. 1). Left-hemisphere metrics were used for all participants regardless of dominant handedness. Despite the presence of left-hand dominant individuals in both groups, the decision to use left-hemispheric pathways was based on the tendency for language to be left-hemisphere lateralized regardless of handedness (Pujol et al., 1999) and in the interest of reducing Type I error rates. Using this approach, FA and MD values of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulum bundle values were all summarized and extracted from the white matter skeleton. These values were then exported to SAS 9.3 for further analysis.


White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

Johnson CP, Juranek J, Swank PR, Kramer L, Cox CS, Ewing-Cobbs L - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

TBSS Results. White matter skeleton appears in green. The cingulum bundle (pink), superior longitudinal fasciculus (blue), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (yellow) regions from the Johns Hopkins University atlas are illustrated. Clusters where OI group FA is significantly greater than the TBI group (p < 0.05, multiple comparison correction) appear red. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660156&req=5

f0005: TBSS Results. White matter skeleton appears in green. The cingulum bundle (pink), superior longitudinal fasciculus (blue), and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (yellow) regions from the Johns Hopkins University atlas are illustrated. Clusters where OI group FA is significantly greater than the TBI group (p < 0.05, multiple comparison correction) appear red. (For interpretation of the references to color in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
Mentions: Probabilistic tracts derived from the Johns Hopkins University white-matter tractography atlas were overlaid onto each brain and masks were derived by thresholding the probability of white matter paths at FA values of 0.2 and then applied to the FA skeleton and summarized to generate FA and MD values for each of the tracts of interest in the left hemisphere (Hua et al., 2008; see Fig. 1). Left-hemisphere metrics were used for all participants regardless of dominant handedness. Despite the presence of left-hand dominant individuals in both groups, the decision to use left-hemispheric pathways was based on the tendency for language to be left-hemisphere lateralized regardless of handedness (Pujol et al., 1999) and in the interest of reducing Type I error rates. Using this approach, FA and MD values of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulum bundle values were all summarized and extracted from the white matter skeleton. These values were then exported to SAS 9.3 for further analysis.

Bottom Line: Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle.Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding.Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Hawaii at Hilo, Department of Psychology, 200 W Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720, United States.

ABSTRACT
Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus