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Scene unseen: Disrupted neuronal adaptation in melancholia during emotional film viewing.

Hyett MP, Parker GB, Guo CC, Zalesky A, Nguyen VT, Yuen T, Breakspear M - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Bottom Line: Disrupted brain networks may underlie the inability to effectively disengage from interoceptive signals in this disorder.This study investigates changes in effective connectivity between cortical systems supporting attention, interoception, and perception in those with melancholic depression when shifting attention from rest to viewing dynamic film stimuli.Using independent component analysis, we identified 8 cortical modes (default mode, executive control, left/right frontoparietal attention, left/right insula, visual and auditory) and studied their dynamics using dynamic causal modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Black Dog Institute Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 300 Herston Road, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Impairments in attention and concentration are distinctive features of melancholic depression, and may diminish the ability to shift focus away from internal dysphoric states. Disrupted brain networks may underlie the inability to effectively disengage from interoceptive signals in this disorder. This study investigates changes in effective connectivity between cortical systems supporting attention, interoception, and perception in those with melancholic depression when shifting attention from rest to viewing dynamic film stimuli. We hypothesised that those with melancholia would show impaired attentional shifting from rest to emotional film viewing, captured in neuronal states that differed little across conditions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from 48 participants (16 melancholic depressed, 16 non-melancholic depressed, and 16 healthy controls) at rest and whilst viewing emotionally salient movies. Using independent component analysis, we identified 8 cortical modes (default mode, executive control, left/right frontoparietal attention, left/right insula, visual and auditory) and studied their dynamics using dynamic causal modelling. Engagement with dynamic emotional material diminished in melancholia and was associated with network-wide increases in effective connectivity. Melancholia was also characterised by an increase in effective connectivity amongst cortical regions involved in attention and interoception when shifting from rest to negative film viewing, with the converse pattern in control participants. The observed involvement of attention- and insula-based cortical systems highlights a potential neurobiological mechanism for disrupted attentional resource allocation, particularly in switching between interoceptive and exteroceptive signals, in melancholia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Analysis pipeline illustrating the use of ICA spatial maps to inform sDCMs. Directed edge weights derived from the sDCMs (both resting state and film viewing fMRI) were used in the NBS to test for condition by group effects.
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f0005: Analysis pipeline illustrating the use of ICA spatial maps to inform sDCMs. Directed edge weights derived from the sDCMs (both resting state and film viewing fMRI) were used in the NBS to test for condition by group effects.

Mentions: Functional images were acquired on a Philips 3-Tesla scanner equipped with a 12-channel head coil. Each image was realigned, normalised (unwarped) and smoothed using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM8) (Friston et al., 1995). Spatial ICA was applied across all subjects and (concatenated) sessions in the fMRI Software Library (FSL). The ICA decomposition generated 70 components, or “modes”, of neuronal, physiological and artefactual origin (Beckmann and Smith, 2004). We identified eight canonical neuronal modes representing emotional, cognitive and perceptual systems of clear relevance to attention and interoception during movie viewing, namely: auditory (AUD); default mode network (DMN); executive control (EXC); left insula (L-INS); right insula (R-INS); left frontoparietal attention (LFP); medial visual pole (MVP); and right frontoparietal attention (RFP; Fig. 1) (Damoiseaux et al., 2006). All components, with the exception of L-INS and R-INS, were matched with previously identified cognitive and sensory networks (Smith et al., 2009), using spatial cross-correlation. The insula modes were identified by first determining the coordinates of bilateral anterior insula cortices using PickAtlas, and using these coordinates to identify anatomically concordant ICA components. Additional acquisition and analytic information is provided in the Supplement.


Scene unseen: Disrupted neuronal adaptation in melancholia during emotional film viewing.

Hyett MP, Parker GB, Guo CC, Zalesky A, Nguyen VT, Yuen T, Breakspear M - Neuroimage Clin (2015)

Analysis pipeline illustrating the use of ICA spatial maps to inform sDCMs. Directed edge weights derived from the sDCMs (both resting state and film viewing fMRI) were used in the NBS to test for condition by group effects.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4660155&req=5

f0005: Analysis pipeline illustrating the use of ICA spatial maps to inform sDCMs. Directed edge weights derived from the sDCMs (both resting state and film viewing fMRI) were used in the NBS to test for condition by group effects.
Mentions: Functional images were acquired on a Philips 3-Tesla scanner equipped with a 12-channel head coil. Each image was realigned, normalised (unwarped) and smoothed using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM8) (Friston et al., 1995). Spatial ICA was applied across all subjects and (concatenated) sessions in the fMRI Software Library (FSL). The ICA decomposition generated 70 components, or “modes”, of neuronal, physiological and artefactual origin (Beckmann and Smith, 2004). We identified eight canonical neuronal modes representing emotional, cognitive and perceptual systems of clear relevance to attention and interoception during movie viewing, namely: auditory (AUD); default mode network (DMN); executive control (EXC); left insula (L-INS); right insula (R-INS); left frontoparietal attention (LFP); medial visual pole (MVP); and right frontoparietal attention (RFP; Fig. 1) (Damoiseaux et al., 2006). All components, with the exception of L-INS and R-INS, were matched with previously identified cognitive and sensory networks (Smith et al., 2009), using spatial cross-correlation. The insula modes were identified by first determining the coordinates of bilateral anterior insula cortices using PickAtlas, and using these coordinates to identify anatomically concordant ICA components. Additional acquisition and analytic information is provided in the Supplement.

Bottom Line: Disrupted brain networks may underlie the inability to effectively disengage from interoceptive signals in this disorder.This study investigates changes in effective connectivity between cortical systems supporting attention, interoception, and perception in those with melancholic depression when shifting attention from rest to viewing dynamic film stimuli.Using independent component analysis, we identified 8 cortical modes (default mode, executive control, left/right frontoparietal attention, left/right insula, visual and auditory) and studied their dynamics using dynamic causal modelling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Black Dog Institute Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 300 Herston Road, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Impairments in attention and concentration are distinctive features of melancholic depression, and may diminish the ability to shift focus away from internal dysphoric states. Disrupted brain networks may underlie the inability to effectively disengage from interoceptive signals in this disorder. This study investigates changes in effective connectivity between cortical systems supporting attention, interoception, and perception in those with melancholic depression when shifting attention from rest to viewing dynamic film stimuli. We hypothesised that those with melancholia would show impaired attentional shifting from rest to emotional film viewing, captured in neuronal states that differed little across conditions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from 48 participants (16 melancholic depressed, 16 non-melancholic depressed, and 16 healthy controls) at rest and whilst viewing emotionally salient movies. Using independent component analysis, we identified 8 cortical modes (default mode, executive control, left/right frontoparietal attention, left/right insula, visual and auditory) and studied their dynamics using dynamic causal modelling. Engagement with dynamic emotional material diminished in melancholia and was associated with network-wide increases in effective connectivity. Melancholia was also characterised by an increase in effective connectivity amongst cortical regions involved in attention and interoception when shifting from rest to negative film viewing, with the converse pattern in control participants. The observed involvement of attention- and insula-based cortical systems highlights a potential neurobiological mechanism for disrupted attentional resource allocation, particularly in switching between interoceptive and exteroceptive signals, in melancholia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus