Limits...
Peripheral venous access in the obese patient.

Prakash S, Arora G, Rani HS - Indian J Anaesth (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi, India.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Venous cut-downs had been done in both lower limbs during previous surgeries... The right cephalic vein was visible in the delto-pectoral groove and was successfully cannulated... The patient was positioned in left lateral position for surgery... This resulted in positional slowing of the crystalloid infusion rate... The cephalic vein is often visible through the skin in the deltopectoral groove and is a potential site for venous access in the obese [Figure 1]... This vein is worth looking for in an obese patient with a difficult peripheral venous access... Loukas et al., in a cadaveric study, found that the cephalic vein was found emerging superficially in the lateral portion of the deltopectoral triangle in 80% of specimens... In the remaining 20% cases, the cephalic vein was located deep to the deltopectoral fascia and fat... The length of the cephalic vein within the deltopectoral triangle ranged from 3.5 to 8.2 cm (mean 4.8 ± 0.7 cm)... The morphometric analysis revealed a mean cephalic vein diameter of 0.8 ± 0.1 cm (range 0.1–1.2 cm)... Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access is also a valuable aid in patients with a known difficult venous access.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The cephalic vein (in the deltopectoral groove) and the external jugular vein cannulated (18 gauge cannula) in an obese patient
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645368&req=5

Figure 1: The cephalic vein (in the deltopectoral groove) and the external jugular vein cannulated (18 gauge cannula) in an obese patient

Mentions: The cephalic vein crosses the surface of the anatomical snuff box, superficial to the radial styloid. This vein is referred to as the ‘houseman's friend’ because of its consistent location at this site and its straight course that allows placement of a large bore IV cannula.[5] It communicates with the basilic vein via the median cubital vein at the elbow. Superiorly, the cephalic vein passes between the deltoid and the pectoralis major muscles before it empties into the axillary vein. The cephalic vein is often visible through the skin in the deltopectoral groove and is a potential site for venous access in the obese [Figure 1]. This vein is worth looking for in an obese patient with a difficult peripheral venous access. Loukas et al.,[6] in a cadaveric study, found that the cephalic vein was found emerging superficially in the lateral portion of the deltopectoral triangle in 80% of specimens. In the remaining 20% cases, the cephalic vein was located deep to the deltopectoral fascia and fat. The length of the cephalic vein within the deltopectoral triangle ranged from 3.5 to 8.2 cm (mean 4.8 ± 0.7 cm). The morphometric analysis revealed a mean cephalic vein diameter of 0.8 ± 0.1 cm (range 0.1–1.2 cm).[6] Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access is also a valuable aid in patients with a known difficult venous access. Nevertheless, knowledge of the potential sites for IV access can improve the success rate for IV line placement in the obese.


Peripheral venous access in the obese patient.

Prakash S, Arora G, Rani HS - Indian J Anaesth (2015)

The cephalic vein (in the deltopectoral groove) and the external jugular vein cannulated (18 gauge cannula) in an obese patient
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645368&req=5

Figure 1: The cephalic vein (in the deltopectoral groove) and the external jugular vein cannulated (18 gauge cannula) in an obese patient
Mentions: The cephalic vein crosses the surface of the anatomical snuff box, superficial to the radial styloid. This vein is referred to as the ‘houseman's friend’ because of its consistent location at this site and its straight course that allows placement of a large bore IV cannula.[5] It communicates with the basilic vein via the median cubital vein at the elbow. Superiorly, the cephalic vein passes between the deltoid and the pectoralis major muscles before it empties into the axillary vein. The cephalic vein is often visible through the skin in the deltopectoral groove and is a potential site for venous access in the obese [Figure 1]. This vein is worth looking for in an obese patient with a difficult peripheral venous access. Loukas et al.,[6] in a cadaveric study, found that the cephalic vein was found emerging superficially in the lateral portion of the deltopectoral triangle in 80% of specimens. In the remaining 20% cases, the cephalic vein was located deep to the deltopectoral fascia and fat. The length of the cephalic vein within the deltopectoral triangle ranged from 3.5 to 8.2 cm (mean 4.8 ± 0.7 cm). The morphometric analysis revealed a mean cephalic vein diameter of 0.8 ± 0.1 cm (range 0.1–1.2 cm).[6] Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access is also a valuable aid in patients with a known difficult venous access. Nevertheless, knowledge of the potential sites for IV access can improve the success rate for IV line placement in the obese.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi, India.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Venous cut-downs had been done in both lower limbs during previous surgeries... The right cephalic vein was visible in the delto-pectoral groove and was successfully cannulated... The patient was positioned in left lateral position for surgery... This resulted in positional slowing of the crystalloid infusion rate... The cephalic vein is often visible through the skin in the deltopectoral groove and is a potential site for venous access in the obese [Figure 1]... This vein is worth looking for in an obese patient with a difficult peripheral venous access... Loukas et al., in a cadaveric study, found that the cephalic vein was found emerging superficially in the lateral portion of the deltopectoral triangle in 80% of specimens... In the remaining 20% cases, the cephalic vein was located deep to the deltopectoral fascia and fat... The length of the cephalic vein within the deltopectoral triangle ranged from 3.5 to 8.2 cm (mean 4.8 ± 0.7 cm)... The morphometric analysis revealed a mean cephalic vein diameter of 0.8 ± 0.1 cm (range 0.1–1.2 cm)... Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access is also a valuable aid in patients with a known difficult venous access.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus