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Characterization of a Novel Hepadnavirus in the White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Great Lakes Region of the United States.

Hahn CM, Iwanowicz LR, Cornman RS, Conway CM, Winton JR, Blazer VS - J. Virol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Phylogenetic analyses confirmed WSHBV as distinct from previously documented hepadnaviruses.These results are not sufficient to draw inferences regarding the association of WSHBV and carcinogenesis in white sucker.This may also offer another model system for mechanistic research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: West Virginia University, School of Natural Resources, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, West Virginia, USA.

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Unrooted phylogram denoting the phylogenetic relationships of mammalian, avian, and fish hepadnavirus genomes. Results are from maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using PhyML (1,000 replicates). Asterisks denote bootstrap support of 100% (***), >90%(**), or >70% (*).
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Figure 6: Unrooted phylogram denoting the phylogenetic relationships of mammalian, avian, and fish hepadnavirus genomes. Results are from maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using PhyML (1,000 replicates). Asterisks denote bootstrap support of 100% (***), >90%(**), or >70% (*).

Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses of predicted WSHBV proteins with respect to those of previously described hepadnaviruses depict well-supported monophyletic groups comprised of the orthohepadnaviruses (mammals) and avihepadnaviruses (birds) which do not include the WSHBV (Fig. 5). Analysis which included the putative hepadnavirus polymerase protein from African cichlid depicts poorly resolved paraphyletic groups between fish species that are distinct from the known viruses of mammalian and bird hosts (Fig. 5A). A similar tree topology was identified for the nucleotide analysis of the complete genomes (Fig. 6). Multiple alignments of the core, polymerase, and surface proteins with a subset of mammalian and avian hepadnaviruses identified amino acid conservation within critical conserved domains (see Fig. S3, S4, and S5 in the supplemental material).


Characterization of a Novel Hepadnavirus in the White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Great Lakes Region of the United States.

Hahn CM, Iwanowicz LR, Cornman RS, Conway CM, Winton JR, Blazer VS - J. Virol. (2015)

Unrooted phylogram denoting the phylogenetic relationships of mammalian, avian, and fish hepadnavirus genomes. Results are from maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using PhyML (1,000 replicates). Asterisks denote bootstrap support of 100% (***), >90%(**), or >70% (*).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645335&req=5

Figure 6: Unrooted phylogram denoting the phylogenetic relationships of mammalian, avian, and fish hepadnavirus genomes. Results are from maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis using PhyML (1,000 replicates). Asterisks denote bootstrap support of 100% (***), >90%(**), or >70% (*).
Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses of predicted WSHBV proteins with respect to those of previously described hepadnaviruses depict well-supported monophyletic groups comprised of the orthohepadnaviruses (mammals) and avihepadnaviruses (birds) which do not include the WSHBV (Fig. 5). Analysis which included the putative hepadnavirus polymerase protein from African cichlid depicts poorly resolved paraphyletic groups between fish species that are distinct from the known viruses of mammalian and bird hosts (Fig. 5A). A similar tree topology was identified for the nucleotide analysis of the complete genomes (Fig. 6). Multiple alignments of the core, polymerase, and surface proteins with a subset of mammalian and avian hepadnaviruses identified amino acid conservation within critical conserved domains (see Fig. S3, S4, and S5 in the supplemental material).

Bottom Line: Phylogenetic analyses confirmed WSHBV as distinct from previously documented hepadnaviruses.These results are not sufficient to draw inferences regarding the association of WSHBV and carcinogenesis in white sucker.This may also offer another model system for mechanistic research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: West Virginia University, School of Natural Resources, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA U.S. Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Kearneysville, West Virginia, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus