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Associations between Sleep Duration and Overweight/Obesity: Results from 66,817 Chinese Adolescents.

Wu J, Wu H, Wang J, Guo L, Deng X, Lu C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of overweight (with 7.0-8.9 h of sleep being considered the reference group) for subjects reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.26 (1.05-1.51), 1.06 (1.00-1.11) and 1.27 (1.14-1.42), respectively.The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of obesity (with 7.0-8.9 h of daily sleep being considered as the reference group) for adolescents reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.24 (0.97-1.57), 0.94 (0.87-1.01) and 1.42 (1.24-1.63), respectively.U-shape associations were found between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in Chinese adolescents and an optimal sleep duration of 7.0-8.0 hours sleep may prevent overweight/obesity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology Guangzhou, 510080 China.

ABSTRACT
The findings about the shapes of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in adolescents were largely inconsistent in the existing literature. We examined the functional forms of the associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in 66,817 Chinese adolescents by modelling sleep duration categorically and continuously. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of overweight (with 7.0-8.9 h of sleep being considered the reference group) for subjects reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.26 (1.05-1.51), 1.06 (1.00-1.11) and 1.27 (1.14-1.42), respectively. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of obesity (with 7.0-8.9 h of daily sleep being considered as the reference group) for adolescents reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.24 (0.97-1.57), 0.94 (0.87-1.01) and 1.42 (1.24-1.63), respectively. Continuous splines regressions support non-linear U shape associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity, with the bottom at around 7.0-8.0 hours sleep (overweight: likelihood ratio = 32.7 p < 0.01; obesity: likelihood ratio = 40.4 p < 0.01). U-shape associations were found between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in Chinese adolescents and an optimal sleep duration of 7.0-8.0 hours sleep may prevent overweight/obesity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-linear regression curves of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity among boys and girls.(A) overweight among girls; (B) overweight among boys; (C) obesity among girls; (D) obesity among boys. All analyses were adjusted for age, whether from single family, parental education, parental smoking, Physical activity, internet and video games, homework, tobacco and alcohol use, depression and anxiety.
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f2: Non-linear regression curves of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity among boys and girls.(A) overweight among girls; (B) overweight among boys; (C) obesity among girls; (D) obesity among boys. All analyses were adjusted for age, whether from single family, parental education, parental smoking, Physical activity, internet and video games, homework, tobacco and alcohol use, depression and anxiety.

Mentions: Based on the likelihood ratio test between the model with restricted cubic splines and the model without the splines, there were significant non-linear relationships between sleep duration and overweight/obesity (overweight: likelihood ratio = 32.7, p < 0.01; obesity: likelihood ratio = 40.4, p < 0.01). To illustrate these associations, we graphed the ORs and 95% CI from models using restricted cubic splines for females and males (Fig. 2). Results indicated that the shapes of the associations were similar for overweight/obesity, an U-shape with the bottom at around 7.0–8.0 hours sleep. However, for obesity, a steeper slope was observed for long sleep duration.


Associations between Sleep Duration and Overweight/Obesity: Results from 66,817 Chinese Adolescents.

Wu J, Wu H, Wang J, Guo L, Deng X, Lu C - Sci Rep (2015)

Non-linear regression curves of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity among boys and girls.(A) overweight among girls; (B) overweight among boys; (C) obesity among girls; (D) obesity among boys. All analyses were adjusted for age, whether from single family, parental education, parental smoking, Physical activity, internet and video games, homework, tobacco and alcohol use, depression and anxiety.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645226&req=5

f2: Non-linear regression curves of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity among boys and girls.(A) overweight among girls; (B) overweight among boys; (C) obesity among girls; (D) obesity among boys. All analyses were adjusted for age, whether from single family, parental education, parental smoking, Physical activity, internet and video games, homework, tobacco and alcohol use, depression and anxiety.
Mentions: Based on the likelihood ratio test between the model with restricted cubic splines and the model without the splines, there were significant non-linear relationships between sleep duration and overweight/obesity (overweight: likelihood ratio = 32.7, p < 0.01; obesity: likelihood ratio = 40.4, p < 0.01). To illustrate these associations, we graphed the ORs and 95% CI from models using restricted cubic splines for females and males (Fig. 2). Results indicated that the shapes of the associations were similar for overweight/obesity, an U-shape with the bottom at around 7.0–8.0 hours sleep. However, for obesity, a steeper slope was observed for long sleep duration.

Bottom Line: The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of overweight (with 7.0-8.9 h of sleep being considered the reference group) for subjects reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.26 (1.05-1.51), 1.06 (1.00-1.11) and 1.27 (1.14-1.42), respectively.The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of obesity (with 7.0-8.9 h of daily sleep being considered as the reference group) for adolescents reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.24 (0.97-1.57), 0.94 (0.87-1.01) and 1.42 (1.24-1.63), respectively.U-shape associations were found between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in Chinese adolescents and an optimal sleep duration of 7.0-8.0 hours sleep may prevent overweight/obesity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology Guangzhou, 510080 China.

ABSTRACT
The findings about the shapes of associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in adolescents were largely inconsistent in the existing literature. We examined the functional forms of the associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in 66,817 Chinese adolescents by modelling sleep duration categorically and continuously. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of overweight (with 7.0-8.9 h of sleep being considered the reference group) for subjects reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.26 (1.05-1.51), 1.06 (1.00-1.11) and 1.27 (1.14-1.42), respectively. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) of obesity (with 7.0-8.9 h of daily sleep being considered as the reference group) for adolescents reporting <5.0 hours, 5.0-6.9 hours and ≥9.0 hours of sleep were 1.24 (0.97-1.57), 0.94 (0.87-1.01) and 1.42 (1.24-1.63), respectively. Continuous splines regressions support non-linear U shape associations between sleep duration and overweight/obesity, with the bottom at around 7.0-8.0 hours sleep (overweight: likelihood ratio = 32.7 p < 0.01; obesity: likelihood ratio = 40.4 p < 0.01). U-shape associations were found between sleep duration and overweight/obesity in Chinese adolescents and an optimal sleep duration of 7.0-8.0 hours sleep may prevent overweight/obesity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus