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Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) DTA curves of the mixture of AP and 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN (mass ratio is 98:2) at different heat rates, (inset) corresponding heat release during the exothermic process, (b) ln (β/T2max) as a function of (1/Tmax). β and Tmax are the heating rate and the related summit peak temperature presented in (a), respectively.
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f7: (a) DTA curves of the mixture of AP and 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN (mass ratio is 98:2) at different heat rates, (inset) corresponding heat release during the exothermic process, (b) ln (β/T2max) as a function of (1/Tmax). β and Tmax are the heating rate and the related summit peak temperature presented in (a), respectively.

Mentions: To study the effects of the dosage of Cu@h-BN samples on the thermal decomposition behaviors of AP, the 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN samples and AP was pre-mixed with a mass ratio ranging from 1:99 to 10:90 to prepare the target mixtures. The decomposition of the mixtures was carried out at a heating rate of 10 °C/min in a N2 atmosphere. As shown in Fig. S5a, the amount of our samples has no evident impacts on the exothermic peak. By comparing the related heat release (Fig. S5b), it can be found that the best mass ratio of Cu@h-BN samples and AP should be 2: 98. Moreover, it is reported that the heat release of AP is highly dependent on the heating rates48. Figure 7a shows the DTA curves of the mixtrues of AP and 25.0 wt % Cu@h-BN at different heating rates, i.e. 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. It can be seen that the heating rate has an obvious effect on the intensity and area of the exothermic peak. From the inset of Fig. 7a, the highest heat release is achieved under the heating rate of 10 °C/min. Most importantly, the kinetic parameter of activation energy (Ea) for AP decomposition with Cu@h-BN samples can be derived from the exothermic peak temperature dependence as a function of heating rate. According to Kissinger’s method49, the Ea can be written as:


Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) DTA curves of the mixture of AP and 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN (mass ratio is 98:2) at different heat rates, (inset) corresponding heat release during the exothermic process, (b) ln (β/T2max) as a function of (1/Tmax). β and Tmax are the heating rate and the related summit peak temperature presented in (a), respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645124&req=5

f7: (a) DTA curves of the mixture of AP and 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN (mass ratio is 98:2) at different heat rates, (inset) corresponding heat release during the exothermic process, (b) ln (β/T2max) as a function of (1/Tmax). β and Tmax are the heating rate and the related summit peak temperature presented in (a), respectively.
Mentions: To study the effects of the dosage of Cu@h-BN samples on the thermal decomposition behaviors of AP, the 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN samples and AP was pre-mixed with a mass ratio ranging from 1:99 to 10:90 to prepare the target mixtures. The decomposition of the mixtures was carried out at a heating rate of 10 °C/min in a N2 atmosphere. As shown in Fig. S5a, the amount of our samples has no evident impacts on the exothermic peak. By comparing the related heat release (Fig. S5b), it can be found that the best mass ratio of Cu@h-BN samples and AP should be 2: 98. Moreover, it is reported that the heat release of AP is highly dependent on the heating rates48. Figure 7a shows the DTA curves of the mixtrues of AP and 25.0 wt % Cu@h-BN at different heating rates, i.e. 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. It can be seen that the heating rate has an obvious effect on the intensity and area of the exothermic peak. From the inset of Fig. 7a, the highest heat release is achieved under the heating rate of 10 °C/min. Most importantly, the kinetic parameter of activation energy (Ea) for AP decomposition with Cu@h-BN samples can be derived from the exothermic peak temperature dependence as a function of heating rate. According to Kissinger’s method49, the Ea can be written as:

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus