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Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.


(a) TG of the mixture of AP and the Cu@h-BN with different Cu contents.
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f6: (a) TG of the mixture of AP and the Cu@h-BN with different Cu contents.

Mentions: The decomposition of AP is further investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). As shown in Fig. 6, the TGA weight loss curve of AP exhibits two clear steps. One is about 10% in the range of 270–310 °C, and the other is about 90% weight loss from 310–440 °C, corresponding to the low-temperature and high-temperature decompositions, respectively. With the addition of Cu@h-BN samples, it is found that the decomposition of AP moves to lower temperature. What is more, the low-temperature and high-temperature decompositions of AP seem to be merged into one process with the increasing the Cu content in the additives of Cu@h-BN. It should be mentioned that the TGA weight loss curves of AP assisted with Cu@h-BN with 25.0 and 18.1 wt% Cu content are closed. The curves of the Cu@h-BN 18.1 wt% Cu content is even lower than that of the Cu@h-BN 25.0 wt% Cu content in the range of the ending minor AP weigh loss. The ending minor weigh loss should not the key contribution of the heat release of AP decomposition. Since the promoting effect of the additives for AP decomposition is generally evaluated based on the summit peak of the decomposition and the heat release83047, the sample of Cu@h-BN with 25.0 wt% Cu content is regarded as the most active one, and taken as example for the further investigation in this study.


Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) TG of the mixture of AP and the Cu@h-BN with different Cu contents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645124&req=5

f6: (a) TG of the mixture of AP and the Cu@h-BN with different Cu contents.
Mentions: The decomposition of AP is further investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). As shown in Fig. 6, the TGA weight loss curve of AP exhibits two clear steps. One is about 10% in the range of 270–310 °C, and the other is about 90% weight loss from 310–440 °C, corresponding to the low-temperature and high-temperature decompositions, respectively. With the addition of Cu@h-BN samples, it is found that the decomposition of AP moves to lower temperature. What is more, the low-temperature and high-temperature decompositions of AP seem to be merged into one process with the increasing the Cu content in the additives of Cu@h-BN. It should be mentioned that the TGA weight loss curves of AP assisted with Cu@h-BN with 25.0 and 18.1 wt% Cu content are closed. The curves of the Cu@h-BN 18.1 wt% Cu content is even lower than that of the Cu@h-BN 25.0 wt% Cu content in the range of the ending minor AP weigh loss. The ending minor weigh loss should not the key contribution of the heat release of AP decomposition. Since the promoting effect of the additives for AP decomposition is generally evaluated based on the summit peak of the decomposition and the heat release83047, the sample of Cu@h-BN with 25.0 wt% Cu content is regarded as the most active one, and taken as example for the further investigation in this study.

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.