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Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images of (a) pure h-BN, (b) 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN, (c) 30.7 wt% Cu@h-BN and (d) pure AP.
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f3: SEM images of (a) pure h-BN, (b) 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN, (c) 30.7 wt% Cu@h-BN and (d) pure AP.

Mentions: The morphology, architecture and microstructures of the samples were next investigated using field-emission scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) obsvations. Figure 3 shows the SEM images of the Cu@h-BN samples with various Cu contents and commercial AP powder. As displayed in the Fig. 3a, the pure h-BN features a layered sturecture. After incorporation with Cu, the Cu particles can be easily distingusihed with a highly contrasty image due to the high electric resistivity of h-BN. As shown in Fig. 3b,c, the Cu nanoparticles are higly dispersed with a diameter of 40–70 nm, and coated by h-BN thin sheets. Moreover, the population of nanoparticles can be controlled by the increasing the Cu contents in the Cu@h-BN composites. Consistent with the SEM results, the TEM images show the Cu@h-BN composites are composed of spherical nanoparticles and thin sheets (Fig. 4a,c). Moreover, from their corresponding high-resolution TEM (HR-TEM) images (Fig. 4b,d), there are two crystal lattice spacing of 0.34 and 0.21 nm coresponding to the (002) crystal plane of h-BN28 and the (111) crystal face of Cu nanoparticles45, respectively. Furthermore, it can be seen that Cu nanoparticles are also surrounded by h-BN sheets, which are in good agreement with the SEM observation. In addition, surface analysis using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) presented in Fig. 4e demonstrates that the sample consists of B, N, O and Cu, which is in agreement with the XPS spectrum shown in Fig. S4a. The element Mo comes from the Mo support used in TEM measurement. Therefore, it can be inferred that the architecture of Cu nanoparticles is under the support and encapsulation of h-BN , which is schematically illuminated in Fig. 4f.


Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

Huang C, Liu Q, Fan W, Qiu X - Sci Rep (2015)

SEM images of (a) pure h-BN, (b) 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN, (c) 30.7 wt% Cu@h-BN and (d) pure AP.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645124&req=5

f3: SEM images of (a) pure h-BN, (b) 25.0 wt% Cu@h-BN, (c) 30.7 wt% Cu@h-BN and (d) pure AP.
Mentions: The morphology, architecture and microstructures of the samples were next investigated using field-emission scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) obsvations. Figure 3 shows the SEM images of the Cu@h-BN samples with various Cu contents and commercial AP powder. As displayed in the Fig. 3a, the pure h-BN features a layered sturecture. After incorporation with Cu, the Cu particles can be easily distingusihed with a highly contrasty image due to the high electric resistivity of h-BN. As shown in Fig. 3b,c, the Cu nanoparticles are higly dispersed with a diameter of 40–70 nm, and coated by h-BN thin sheets. Moreover, the population of nanoparticles can be controlled by the increasing the Cu contents in the Cu@h-BN composites. Consistent with the SEM results, the TEM images show the Cu@h-BN composites are composed of spherical nanoparticles and thin sheets (Fig. 4a,c). Moreover, from their corresponding high-resolution TEM (HR-TEM) images (Fig. 4b,d), there are two crystal lattice spacing of 0.34 and 0.21 nm coresponding to the (002) crystal plane of h-BN28 and the (111) crystal face of Cu nanoparticles45, respectively. Furthermore, it can be seen that Cu nanoparticles are also surrounded by h-BN sheets, which are in good agreement with the SEM observation. In addition, surface analysis using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) presented in Fig. 4e demonstrates that the sample consists of B, N, O and Cu, which is in agreement with the XPS spectrum shown in Fig. S4a. The element Mo comes from the Mo support used in TEM measurement. Therefore, it can be inferred that the architecture of Cu nanoparticles is under the support and encapsulation of h-BN , which is schematically illuminated in Fig. 4f.

Bottom Line: Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride.The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, College of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material--hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

No MeSH data available.