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Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships.

Garnier-Laplace J, Beaugelin-Seiller K, Della-Vedova C, Métivier JM, Ritz C, Mousseau TA, Møller AP - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success.We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014.The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Pôle Radioprotection, Environnement, Déchets, Crise, PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Bâtiment 159, BP3, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h(-1)), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Log logistic model fitted to randomly predicted total number of birds derived from the global GLMM, and its ED50 prediction and associated 95% Confidence Interval (ED50 is the total absorbed dose causing a 50% reduction in the total number of birds).
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f4: Log logistic model fitted to randomly predicted total number of birds derived from the global GLMM, and its ED50 prediction and associated 95% Confidence Interval (ED50 is the total absorbed dose causing a 50% reduction in the total number of birds).

Mentions: Dose –response modelling based on a subset of randomly selected total doses and corresponding total number of birds estimated from the previously fitted GLMM (Table 2) allowed us to predict that a total absorbed dose of 0.55 Gy with CI 95% [0.45; 0.70] caused a 50% loss in the total number of birds (Fig. 4).


Radiological dose reconstruction for birds reconciles outcomes of Fukushima with knowledge of dose-effect relationships.

Garnier-Laplace J, Beaugelin-Seiller K, Della-Vedova C, Métivier JM, Ritz C, Mousseau TA, Møller AP - Sci Rep (2015)

Log logistic model fitted to randomly predicted total number of birds derived from the global GLMM, and its ED50 prediction and associated 95% Confidence Interval (ED50 is the total absorbed dose causing a 50% reduction in the total number of birds).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645120&req=5

f4: Log logistic model fitted to randomly predicted total number of birds derived from the global GLMM, and its ED50 prediction and associated 95% Confidence Interval (ED50 is the total absorbed dose causing a 50% reduction in the total number of birds).
Mentions: Dose –response modelling based on a subset of randomly selected total doses and corresponding total number of birds estimated from the previously fitted GLMM (Table 2) allowed us to predict that a total absorbed dose of 0.55 Gy with CI 95% [0.45; 0.70] caused a 50% loss in the total number of birds (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success.We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014.The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Pôle Radioprotection, Environnement, Déchets, Crise, PRP-ENV/SERIS, Cadarache, Bâtiment 159, BP3, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
We reconstructed the radiological dose for birds observed at 300 census sites in the 50-km northwest area affected by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant over 2011-2014. Substituting the ambient dose rate measured at the census points (from 0.16 to 31 μGy h(-1)) with the dose rate reconstructed for adult birds of each species (from 0.3 to 97 μGy h(-1)), we confirmed that the overall bird abundance at Fukushima decreased with increasing total doses. This relationship was directly consistent with exposure levels found in the literature to induce physiological disturbances in birds. Among the 57 species constituting the observed bird community, we found that 90% were likely chronically exposed at a dose rate that could potentially affect their reproductive success. We quantified a loss of 22.6% of the total number of individuals per increment of one unit log10-tansformed total dose (in Gy), over the four-year post-accident period in the explored area. We estimated that a total dose of 0.55 Gy reduced by 50% the total number of birds in the study area over 2011-2014. The data also suggest a significant positive relationship between total dose and species diversity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus