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Proteins: interaction at a distance.

Laskowski RA, Thornton JM - IUCrJ (2015)

Bottom Line: How do the surface side chains of a protein behave when it binds to another protein?Do they optimize interactions by crumpling inwards or by extending outwards?

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) , Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK.

ABSTRACT
How do the surface side chains of a protein behave when it binds to another protein? Do they optimize interactions by crumpling inwards or by extending outwards?

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram showing possible behaviours of surface side chains when two proteins interact. (a) The two proteins are shown in surface representation with their solvent accessible surface side chains depicted as red sticks. (b) Compact interaction, where the side-chain conformations fold inwards as the proteins dock together. (c) Rigid interaction, in which the side-chain conformations hardly alter, in terms of solvent accessibility, from their conformations in (a). (d) Extended interaction, with the side chains stretching out to greet their partners as the proteins approach.
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fig1: Schematic diagram showing possible behaviours of surface side chains when two proteins interact. (a) The two proteins are shown in surface representation with their solvent accessible surface side chains depicted as red sticks. (b) Compact interaction, where the side-chain conformations fold inwards as the proteins dock together. (c) Rigid interaction, in which the side-chain conformations hardly alter, in terms of solvent accessibility, from their conformations in (a). (d) Extended interaction, with the side chains stretching out to greet their partners as the proteins approach.

Mentions: Proteins are rather social molecules, cooperating and networking with others, interacting with DNA and RNA, nestling in cellular membranes, and working closely with small metabolites. They rarely act alone, and some are even highly promiscuous (Nobeli et al., 2009 ▸). So, how do proteins greet one another when they meet (Fig. 1 ▸a)? Do their surface side chains remain largely rigid as they shake hands (Fig. 1 ▸c), do they crumple up against each other like the limbs of crushed rush-hour commuters (Fig. 1 ▸b), or are their welcomes more distant and standoffish (Fig. 1 ▸d)?


Proteins: interaction at a distance.

Laskowski RA, Thornton JM - IUCrJ (2015)

Schematic diagram showing possible behaviours of surface side chains when two proteins interact. (a) The two proteins are shown in surface representation with their solvent accessible surface side chains depicted as red sticks. (b) Compact interaction, where the side-chain conformations fold inwards as the proteins dock together. (c) Rigid interaction, in which the side-chain conformations hardly alter, in terms of solvent accessibility, from their conformations in (a). (d) Extended interaction, with the side chains stretching out to greet their partners as the proteins approach.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4645104&req=5

fig1: Schematic diagram showing possible behaviours of surface side chains when two proteins interact. (a) The two proteins are shown in surface representation with their solvent accessible surface side chains depicted as red sticks. (b) Compact interaction, where the side-chain conformations fold inwards as the proteins dock together. (c) Rigid interaction, in which the side-chain conformations hardly alter, in terms of solvent accessibility, from their conformations in (a). (d) Extended interaction, with the side chains stretching out to greet their partners as the proteins approach.
Mentions: Proteins are rather social molecules, cooperating and networking with others, interacting with DNA and RNA, nestling in cellular membranes, and working closely with small metabolites. They rarely act alone, and some are even highly promiscuous (Nobeli et al., 2009 ▸). So, how do proteins greet one another when they meet (Fig. 1 ▸a)? Do their surface side chains remain largely rigid as they shake hands (Fig. 1 ▸c), do they crumple up against each other like the limbs of crushed rush-hour commuters (Fig. 1 ▸b), or are their welcomes more distant and standoffish (Fig. 1 ▸d)?

Bottom Line: How do the surface side chains of a protein behave when it binds to another protein?Do they optimize interactions by crumpling inwards or by extending outwards?

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) , Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK.

ABSTRACT
How do the surface side chains of a protein behave when it binds to another protein? Do they optimize interactions by crumpling inwards or by extending outwards?

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus