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Integrated III-V Photonic Crystal--Si waveguide platform with tailored optomechanical coupling.

Tsvirkun V, Surrente A, Raineri F, Beaudoin G, Raj R, Sagnes I, Robert-Philip I, Braive R - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Optomechanical systems, in which the vibrations of a mechanical resonator are coupled to an electromagnetic radiation, have permitted the investigation of a wealth of novel physical effects.To fully exploit these phenomena in realistic circuits and to achieve different functionalities on a single chip, the integration of optomechanical resonators is mandatory.This scalable platform allows for an unprecedented control on the optomechanical coupling mechanisms, with a potential benefit in cooling experiments, and for the development of multi-element optomechanical circuits in the framework of optomechanically-driven signal-processing applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures LPN-CNRS UPR-20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France.

ABSTRACT
Optomechanical systems, in which the vibrations of a mechanical resonator are coupled to an electromagnetic radiation, have permitted the investigation of a wealth of novel physical effects. To fully exploit these phenomena in realistic circuits and to achieve different functionalities on a single chip, the integration of optomechanical resonators is mandatory. Here, we propose a novel approach to heterogeneously integrate arrays of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect cavities on top of silicon-on-insulator waveguides. The optomechanical response of these devices is investigated and evidences an optomechanical coupling involving both dispersive and dissipative mechanisms. By controlling the optical coupling between the waveguide and the photonic crystal, we were able to vary and understand the relative strength of these couplings. This scalable platform allows for an unprecedented control on the optomechanical coupling mechanisms, with a potential benefit in cooling experiments, and for the development of multi-element optomechanical circuits in the framework of optomechanically-driven signal-processing applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between simulated and experimental coupling coefficients.(a) Dispersive coupling coefficient gω and (b) external dissipative coupling coefficient gκ,e plotted against waveguide width wwg. Blue, up-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M1. Blue, down-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M2. Red squares: simulated values, air gap of 230 nm. Orange diamonds: computed values, air gap of 150 nm.
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f4: Comparison between simulated and experimental coupling coefficients.(a) Dispersive coupling coefficient gω and (b) external dissipative coupling coefficient gκ,e plotted against waveguide width wwg. Blue, up-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M1. Blue, down-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M2. Red squares: simulated values, air gap of 230 nm. Orange diamonds: computed values, air gap of 150 nm.

Mentions: The values of gω and of gκ,e extracted from fitting the experimental data to Eq. (1) as a function of wwg both for M1 and for M2 are summarised in Fig. 4(a,b), respectively. The observed trend of these two quantities is directly related to the shape and the width of the optomechanical response SP(Ωm, Δ/κ).


Integrated III-V Photonic Crystal--Si waveguide platform with tailored optomechanical coupling.

Tsvirkun V, Surrente A, Raineri F, Beaudoin G, Raj R, Sagnes I, Robert-Philip I, Braive R - Sci Rep (2015)

Comparison between simulated and experimental coupling coefficients.(a) Dispersive coupling coefficient gω and (b) external dissipative coupling coefficient gκ,e plotted against waveguide width wwg. Blue, up-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M1. Blue, down-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M2. Red squares: simulated values, air gap of 230 nm. Orange diamonds: computed values, air gap of 150 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644963&req=5

f4: Comparison between simulated and experimental coupling coefficients.(a) Dispersive coupling coefficient gω and (b) external dissipative coupling coefficient gκ,e plotted against waveguide width wwg. Blue, up-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M1. Blue, down-pointing triangles: fit of experimental points, M2. Red squares: simulated values, air gap of 230 nm. Orange diamonds: computed values, air gap of 150 nm.
Mentions: The values of gω and of gκ,e extracted from fitting the experimental data to Eq. (1) as a function of wwg both for M1 and for M2 are summarised in Fig. 4(a,b), respectively. The observed trend of these two quantities is directly related to the shape and the width of the optomechanical response SP(Ωm, Δ/κ).

Bottom Line: Optomechanical systems, in which the vibrations of a mechanical resonator are coupled to an electromagnetic radiation, have permitted the investigation of a wealth of novel physical effects.To fully exploit these phenomena in realistic circuits and to achieve different functionalities on a single chip, the integration of optomechanical resonators is mandatory.This scalable platform allows for an unprecedented control on the optomechanical coupling mechanisms, with a potential benefit in cooling experiments, and for the development of multi-element optomechanical circuits in the framework of optomechanically-driven signal-processing applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures LPN-CNRS UPR-20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France.

ABSTRACT
Optomechanical systems, in which the vibrations of a mechanical resonator are coupled to an electromagnetic radiation, have permitted the investigation of a wealth of novel physical effects. To fully exploit these phenomena in realistic circuits and to achieve different functionalities on a single chip, the integration of optomechanical resonators is mandatory. Here, we propose a novel approach to heterogeneously integrate arrays of two-dimensional photonic crystal defect cavities on top of silicon-on-insulator waveguides. The optomechanical response of these devices is investigated and evidences an optomechanical coupling involving both dispersive and dissipative mechanisms. By controlling the optical coupling between the waveguide and the photonic crystal, we were able to vary and understand the relative strength of these couplings. This scalable platform allows for an unprecedented control on the optomechanical coupling mechanisms, with a potential benefit in cooling experiments, and for the development of multi-element optomechanical circuits in the framework of optomechanically-driven signal-processing applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus