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Hypertension is an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes: the Korean genome and epidemiology study.

Kim MJ, Lim NK, Choi SJ, Park HY - Hypertens. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea.These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI).Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular and Rare Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Chungbuk, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Hypertension and diabetes share common risk factors and frequently co-occur. Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea. This study investigated the relationship of prehypertension and hypertension with type 2 diabetes in 7150 middle-aged Koreans, as well as the effect of BP control on diabetes development over 8 years. At 8 years, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 11.2, 16.7 and 21.5% of baseline normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. The overall incidence rate of diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years. Subjects with baseline prehypertension (hazard ratio (HR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.48) and hypertension (HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29-1.76) were at higher risk of diabetes than normotensive subjects after controlling for potential confounders (P-value for trend <0.001). These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI). The risk of diabetes was significantly higher in subjects who had normal BP at baseline and progressed to prehypertention or hypertension at 8 years (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than those with controlled BP, but these associations were not observed in subjects with baseline prehypertension and hypertension. These findings showed that prehypertension and hypertension are significantly associated with the development of diabetes, independent of baseline glucose status, sex and BMI. Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of baseline glucose status and BP on cumulative incidence rates of diabetes over 8 years.
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fig2: Effect of baseline glucose status and BP on cumulative incidence rates of diabetes over 8 years.

Mentions: Table 2 shows the risk of incident type 2 diabetes by BP categories. During the 8-year follow-up period, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 442 (11.2%), 295 (16.7%) and 312 (21.5%) subjects with baseline normal BP, prehypertension and hypertension, respectively. The overall incidence rate for diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years, which increased from 16.7 per 1000 person-years in baseline normotensive to 34.1 per 1000 person-years in hypertensive subjects (Figure 2). The incidence of diabetes after 8 years was higher in subjects with baseline prediabetes than NGT. Compared with subjects having baseline normal BP, those with baseline prehypertension (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.09–1.48) and hypertension (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29–1.76) were at higher risk for incident diabetes (P-value for trend <0.001, Table 2); these associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status. For further analysis, prehypertension category was divided into two groups: those with systolic BP of 120–129 mm Hg or diastolic BP of 80–84 mm Hg and those with systolic BP of 130–139 mm Hg or diastolic BP of 85–89 mm Hg. Relative to normotensive subjects, diabetes risk was significantly higher in subjects with BP of 130–139/85–89 mm Hg (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20–1.82), but not for those with BP of 120–129/80–84 mm Hg (data not shown).


Hypertension is an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes: the Korean genome and epidemiology study.

Kim MJ, Lim NK, Choi SJ, Park HY - Hypertens. Res. (2015)

Effect of baseline glucose status and BP on cumulative incidence rates of diabetes over 8 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644940&req=5

fig2: Effect of baseline glucose status and BP on cumulative incidence rates of diabetes over 8 years.
Mentions: Table 2 shows the risk of incident type 2 diabetes by BP categories. During the 8-year follow-up period, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 442 (11.2%), 295 (16.7%) and 312 (21.5%) subjects with baseline normal BP, prehypertension and hypertension, respectively. The overall incidence rate for diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years, which increased from 16.7 per 1000 person-years in baseline normotensive to 34.1 per 1000 person-years in hypertensive subjects (Figure 2). The incidence of diabetes after 8 years was higher in subjects with baseline prediabetes than NGT. Compared with subjects having baseline normal BP, those with baseline prehypertension (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.09–1.48) and hypertension (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29–1.76) were at higher risk for incident diabetes (P-value for trend <0.001, Table 2); these associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status. For further analysis, prehypertension category was divided into two groups: those with systolic BP of 120–129 mm Hg or diastolic BP of 80–84 mm Hg and those with systolic BP of 130–139 mm Hg or diastolic BP of 85–89 mm Hg. Relative to normotensive subjects, diabetes risk was significantly higher in subjects with BP of 130–139/85–89 mm Hg (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20–1.82), but not for those with BP of 120–129/80–84 mm Hg (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea.These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI).Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular and Rare Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Chungbuk, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Hypertension and diabetes share common risk factors and frequently co-occur. Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea. This study investigated the relationship of prehypertension and hypertension with type 2 diabetes in 7150 middle-aged Koreans, as well as the effect of BP control on diabetes development over 8 years. At 8 years, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 11.2, 16.7 and 21.5% of baseline normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. The overall incidence rate of diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years. Subjects with baseline prehypertension (hazard ratio (HR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.48) and hypertension (HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29-1.76) were at higher risk of diabetes than normotensive subjects after controlling for potential confounders (P-value for trend <0.001). These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI). The risk of diabetes was significantly higher in subjects who had normal BP at baseline and progressed to prehypertention or hypertension at 8 years (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than those with controlled BP, but these associations were not observed in subjects with baseline prehypertension and hypertension. These findings showed that prehypertension and hypertension are significantly associated with the development of diabetes, independent of baseline glucose status, sex and BMI. Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus