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Influence of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation on esthetics.

Corte CC, Silveira BL, Marquezan M - Dental Press J Orthod (2015)

Bottom Line: Their opinions were compared by qualitative and quantitative analyses.A total of 45 laypeople, 27 dentists and 31 orthodontists filled out the questionnaires.The other categories of evaluators identified asymmetries and assigned significantly lower grades, starting from 5.88° of occlusal plane inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro Universitário Franciscano, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the degree of perception of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation in facial esthetics, assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists.

Methods: A woman with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation was selected and, based on her original photograph, four new images were created correcting the deviations and creating more symmetric faces and smiles. Examiners assessed the images by means of a questionnaire. Their opinions were compared by qualitative and quantitative analyses.

Results: A total of 45 laypeople, 27 dentists and 31 orthodontists filled out the questionnaires. All groups were able to perceive the asymmetry; however, orthodontists were more sensitive, identifying asymmetries as from 4.32° of occlusal plane inclination and 4.155 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05). The other categories of evaluators identified asymmetries and assigned significantly lower grades, starting from 5.88° of occlusal plane inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05).

Conclusion: Occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation were perceived by all groups, but orthodontists presented higher perception of deviations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

- Original smile (green label), with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm ofmandibular deviation, and their corrections (1.47° and 1.385 mm in eachphoto).
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f01: - Original smile (green label), with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm ofmandibular deviation, and their corrections (1.47° and 1.385 mm in eachphoto).

Mentions: Based on patient's original photograph, a professional designer created four smiles bymeans of Adobe Photoshop CS5 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, California) software. Firstly,the pupillary plane was traced and positioned parallel to the ground. A new line wastraced starting from the center of the left pupil up to the tip of the maxillary leftcanine cusp.23 The distance between these points was transferred to the rightside, and, thus, it was possible to trace the ideal occlusal plane. The differencebetween the angle formed by the patient's real inclination and the digital manipulationat an angle equal to zero resulted in 5.88°. The four manipulated smiles had occlusalplane inclination progressively corrected by 1.47° in each photo, until the smile becamesymmetrical. As the occlusal plane was being altered, mandibular deviation was alsomanipulated until it was completely corrected (1.385 mm for each photograph, totaling5.54 mm), rendering the face more symmetrical and making the facial midline match withthe center of the mentum (Fig 1). It is emphasizedthat the model agreed with the use of her image in the research by signing a term ofauthorization for image use.


Influence of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation on esthetics.

Corte CC, Silveira BL, Marquezan M - Dental Press J Orthod (2015)

- Original smile (green label), with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm ofmandibular deviation, and their corrections (1.47° and 1.385 mm in eachphoto).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644919&req=5

f01: - Original smile (green label), with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm ofmandibular deviation, and their corrections (1.47° and 1.385 mm in eachphoto).
Mentions: Based on patient's original photograph, a professional designer created four smiles bymeans of Adobe Photoshop CS5 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, California) software. Firstly,the pupillary plane was traced and positioned parallel to the ground. A new line wastraced starting from the center of the left pupil up to the tip of the maxillary leftcanine cusp.23 The distance between these points was transferred to the rightside, and, thus, it was possible to trace the ideal occlusal plane. The differencebetween the angle formed by the patient's real inclination and the digital manipulationat an angle equal to zero resulted in 5.88°. The four manipulated smiles had occlusalplane inclination progressively corrected by 1.47° in each photo, until the smile becamesymmetrical. As the occlusal plane was being altered, mandibular deviation was alsomanipulated until it was completely corrected (1.385 mm for each photograph, totaling5.54 mm), rendering the face more symmetrical and making the facial midline match withthe center of the mentum (Fig 1). It is emphasizedthat the model agreed with the use of her image in the research by signing a term ofauthorization for image use.

Bottom Line: Their opinions were compared by qualitative and quantitative analyses.A total of 45 laypeople, 27 dentists and 31 orthodontists filled out the questionnaires.The other categories of evaluators identified asymmetries and assigned significantly lower grades, starting from 5.88° of occlusal plane inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro Universitário Franciscano, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the degree of perception of occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation in facial esthetics, assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists.

Methods: A woman with 5.88° of inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation was selected and, based on her original photograph, four new images were created correcting the deviations and creating more symmetric faces and smiles. Examiners assessed the images by means of a questionnaire. Their opinions were compared by qualitative and quantitative analyses.

Results: A total of 45 laypeople, 27 dentists and 31 orthodontists filled out the questionnaires. All groups were able to perceive the asymmetry; however, orthodontists were more sensitive, identifying asymmetries as from 4.32° of occlusal plane inclination and 4.155 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05). The other categories of evaluators identified asymmetries and assigned significantly lower grades, starting from 5.88° of occlusal plane inclination and 5.54 mm of mandibular deviation (p< 0.05).

Conclusion: Occlusal plane inclination and mandibular deviation were perceived by all groups, but orthodontists presented higher perception of deviations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus