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Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing.

Cao J, Gu R, Bi X, Zhu X, Wu H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group.These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2).In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Harbin Medical University Daqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies on social anxiety have demonstrated negative-expectancy bias in social contexts. In this study, we used a paradigm that employed self-relevant positive or negative social feedback, in order to test whether this negative expectancy manifests in event-related potentials (ERPs) during social evaluation among socially anxious individuals. Behavioral data revealed that individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) showed more negative expectancy of peer acceptance both in the experiment and in daily life than did the healthy control participants. Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group. SAD participants demonstrated a larger feedback-related negativity (FRN) to positive feedback than to negative feedback. In addition, SAD participants showed a more positive ΔFRN (ΔFRN = negative - positive). Furthermore, acceptance expectancy in daily life correlated negatively with ΔFRN amplitude, while the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score correlated positively with the ΔFRN amplitude. Finally, the acceptance expectancy in daily life fully mediated the relationship between the IAS and ΔFRN. These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2). However, the SAD group exhibited a larger FRN to positive social feedback than to negative social feedback, demonstrating their dysfunction in the late stage of social feedback processing. In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients for the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN. Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients showing the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN as mediated by acceptance expectancy. The standardized regression coefficient between the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score and ΔFRN, controlling for acceptance expectancy, was 0.05. Social anxiety (IAS score) predicted the acceptance expectancy (B = -0.663), which in turn predicted ΔFRN (B = -0.469). The direct effect of IAS on ΔFRN (when expectancy bias was included in the model) was not significant, p = 0.77, while the indirect effect was significant, indicating that acceptance expectancy fully mediated the relationship between IAS and ΔFRN. X: predictor, Y: outcome variable, M: mediate variable, ∗p < 0.05; ∗∗p < 0.01; ∗∗∗p < 0.001.
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Figure 3: Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients for the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN. Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients showing the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN as mediated by acceptance expectancy. The standardized regression coefficient between the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score and ΔFRN, controlling for acceptance expectancy, was 0.05. Social anxiety (IAS score) predicted the acceptance expectancy (B = -0.663), which in turn predicted ΔFRN (B = -0.469). The direct effect of IAS on ΔFRN (when expectancy bias was included in the model) was not significant, p = 0.77, while the indirect effect was significant, indicating that acceptance expectancy fully mediated the relationship between IAS and ΔFRN. X: predictor, Y: outcome variable, M: mediate variable, ∗p < 0.05; ∗∗p < 0.01; ∗∗∗p < 0.001.

Mentions: We conducted a mediation analysis to assess whether the acceptance expectancy in real life lays in the causal path between the IAS score and the FRN amplitude, using a bootstrapping number of 5000 (Preacher and Hayes, 2008). In the analysis model, ΔFRN was set as the outcome variable, acceptation expectancy in real life served as the mediator, and the IAS score was entered as the predictor (see Figure 3), and the analysis was performed as described by (Preacher and Hayes, 2004). First, we found that the direct effect in the model with acceptance expectancy was not significant (B = 0.56, SE = 0.19, p > 0.77). Second, a significant indirect effect of social anxiety through acceptance expectancy was confirmed (B = 0.287, SE = 1.34, p = 0.025) at a 95% bias-corrected confidence interval (95%, CI: 0.0105-0.5624), establishing that acceptance expectancy was in the causal path between social anxiety and ΔFRN.


Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing.

Cao J, Gu R, Bi X, Zhu X, Wu H - Front Psychol (2015)

Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients for the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN. Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients showing the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN as mediated by acceptance expectancy. The standardized regression coefficient between the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score and ΔFRN, controlling for acceptance expectancy, was 0.05. Social anxiety (IAS score) predicted the acceptance expectancy (B = -0.663), which in turn predicted ΔFRN (B = -0.469). The direct effect of IAS on ΔFRN (when expectancy bias was included in the model) was not significant, p = 0.77, while the indirect effect was significant, indicating that acceptance expectancy fully mediated the relationship between IAS and ΔFRN. X: predictor, Y: outcome variable, M: mediate variable, ∗p < 0.05; ∗∗p < 0.01; ∗∗∗p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644791&req=5

Figure 3: Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients for the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN. Mediation model with standardized regression coefficients showing the relationship between social anxiety and ΔFRN as mediated by acceptance expectancy. The standardized regression coefficient between the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score and ΔFRN, controlling for acceptance expectancy, was 0.05. Social anxiety (IAS score) predicted the acceptance expectancy (B = -0.663), which in turn predicted ΔFRN (B = -0.469). The direct effect of IAS on ΔFRN (when expectancy bias was included in the model) was not significant, p = 0.77, while the indirect effect was significant, indicating that acceptance expectancy fully mediated the relationship between IAS and ΔFRN. X: predictor, Y: outcome variable, M: mediate variable, ∗p < 0.05; ∗∗p < 0.01; ∗∗∗p < 0.001.
Mentions: We conducted a mediation analysis to assess whether the acceptance expectancy in real life lays in the causal path between the IAS score and the FRN amplitude, using a bootstrapping number of 5000 (Preacher and Hayes, 2008). In the analysis model, ΔFRN was set as the outcome variable, acceptation expectancy in real life served as the mediator, and the IAS score was entered as the predictor (see Figure 3), and the analysis was performed as described by (Preacher and Hayes, 2004). First, we found that the direct effect in the model with acceptance expectancy was not significant (B = 0.56, SE = 0.19, p > 0.77). Second, a significant indirect effect of social anxiety through acceptance expectancy was confirmed (B = 0.287, SE = 1.34, p = 0.025) at a 95% bias-corrected confidence interval (95%, CI: 0.0105-0.5624), establishing that acceptance expectancy was in the causal path between social anxiety and ΔFRN.

Bottom Line: Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group.These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2).In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Harbin Medical University Daqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies on social anxiety have demonstrated negative-expectancy bias in social contexts. In this study, we used a paradigm that employed self-relevant positive or negative social feedback, in order to test whether this negative expectancy manifests in event-related potentials (ERPs) during social evaluation among socially anxious individuals. Behavioral data revealed that individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) showed more negative expectancy of peer acceptance both in the experiment and in daily life than did the healthy control participants. Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group. SAD participants demonstrated a larger feedback-related negativity (FRN) to positive feedback than to negative feedback. In addition, SAD participants showed a more positive ΔFRN (ΔFRN = negative - positive). Furthermore, acceptance expectancy in daily life correlated negatively with ΔFRN amplitude, while the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score correlated positively with the ΔFRN amplitude. Finally, the acceptance expectancy in daily life fully mediated the relationship between the IAS and ΔFRN. These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2). However, the SAD group exhibited a larger FRN to positive social feedback than to negative social feedback, demonstrating their dysfunction in the late stage of social feedback processing. In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus