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Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing.

Cao J, Gu R, Bi X, Zhu X, Wu H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group.These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2).In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Harbin Medical University Daqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies on social anxiety have demonstrated negative-expectancy bias in social contexts. In this study, we used a paradigm that employed self-relevant positive or negative social feedback, in order to test whether this negative expectancy manifests in event-related potentials (ERPs) during social evaluation among socially anxious individuals. Behavioral data revealed that individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) showed more negative expectancy of peer acceptance both in the experiment and in daily life than did the healthy control participants. Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group. SAD participants demonstrated a larger feedback-related negativity (FRN) to positive feedback than to negative feedback. In addition, SAD participants showed a more positive ΔFRN (ΔFRN = negative - positive). Furthermore, acceptance expectancy in daily life correlated negatively with ΔFRN amplitude, while the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score correlated positively with the ΔFRN amplitude. Finally, the acceptance expectancy in daily life fully mediated the relationship between the IAS and ΔFRN. These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2). However, the SAD group exhibited a larger FRN to positive social feedback than to negative social feedback, demonstrating their dysfunction in the late stage of social feedback processing. In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A sample trial in the social feedback stage. The face of the evaluator was first presented for 2000-2500 ms; then, feedback of acceptance (✓) or rejection (×) was presented below the face for 1000-1500 ms.
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Figure 1: A sample trial in the social feedback stage. The face of the evaluator was first presented for 2000-2500 ms; then, feedback of acceptance (✓) or rejection (×) was presented below the face for 1000-1500 ms.

Mentions: Three to five days before the formal experiment, participants were asked to upload their profiles with their photos, study majors, personal interests, and so on. Participants were told that they would be evaluated by another 120 peer participants (half of whom were females) based on the impression created by their profiles. To ensure the plausibility of this cover story, all participants were asked to evaluate the profiles of 10 fake participants and to vote on whether this person could remain in the group. This approach was consistent with the “Island Getaway task” in which individuals need to vote whether the presented people may remain on the island, given the limited resources (Kujawa et al., 2014). Thereafter, the formal procedure presented 60 faces of pseudo-participants with positive social feedback (i.e., social acceptance), and another 60 faces with negative social feedback (i.e., social rejection). All 120 faces were presented twice, resulting in 240 trials in total. The procedure is illustrated in Figure 1.


Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing.

Cao J, Gu R, Bi X, Zhu X, Wu H - Front Psychol (2015)

A sample trial in the social feedback stage. The face of the evaluator was first presented for 2000-2500 ms; then, feedback of acceptance (✓) or rejection (×) was presented below the face for 1000-1500 ms.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644791&req=5

Figure 1: A sample trial in the social feedback stage. The face of the evaluator was first presented for 2000-2500 ms; then, feedback of acceptance (✓) or rejection (×) was presented below the face for 1000-1500 ms.
Mentions: Three to five days before the formal experiment, participants were asked to upload their profiles with their photos, study majors, personal interests, and so on. Participants were told that they would be evaluated by another 120 peer participants (half of whom were females) based on the impression created by their profiles. To ensure the plausibility of this cover story, all participants were asked to evaluate the profiles of 10 fake participants and to vote on whether this person could remain in the group. This approach was consistent with the “Island Getaway task” in which individuals need to vote whether the presented people may remain on the island, given the limited resources (Kujawa et al., 2014). Thereafter, the formal procedure presented 60 faces of pseudo-participants with positive social feedback (i.e., social acceptance), and another 60 faces with negative social feedback (i.e., social rejection). All 120 faces were presented twice, resulting in 240 trials in total. The procedure is illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group.These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2).In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Harbin Medical University Daqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies on social anxiety have demonstrated negative-expectancy bias in social contexts. In this study, we used a paradigm that employed self-relevant positive or negative social feedback, in order to test whether this negative expectancy manifests in event-related potentials (ERPs) during social evaluation among socially anxious individuals. Behavioral data revealed that individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) showed more negative expectancy of peer acceptance both in the experiment and in daily life than did the healthy control participants. Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group. SAD participants demonstrated a larger feedback-related negativity (FRN) to positive feedback than to negative feedback. In addition, SAD participants showed a more positive ΔFRN (ΔFRN = negative - positive). Furthermore, acceptance expectancy in daily life correlated negatively with ΔFRN amplitude, while the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score correlated positively with the ΔFRN amplitude. Finally, the acceptance expectancy in daily life fully mediated the relationship between the IAS and ΔFRN. These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2). However, the SAD group exhibited a larger FRN to positive social feedback than to negative social feedback, demonstrating their dysfunction in the late stage of social feedback processing. In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus