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Blood-Based Proteomic Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

Baird AL, Westwood S, Lovestone S - Front Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease.Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various "omics" approaches in order to achieve this.This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford , Oxford , UK.

ABSTRACT
The complexity of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its long prodromal phase poses challenges for early diagnosis and yet allows for the possibility of the development of disease modifying treatments for secondary prevention. It is, therefore, of importance to develop biomarkers, in particular, in the preclinical or early phases that reflect the pathological characteristics of the disease and, moreover, could be of utility in triaging subjects for preventative therapeutic clinical trials. Much research has sought biomarkers for diagnostic purposes by comparing affected people to unaffected controls. However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease. Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various "omics" approaches in order to achieve this. This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Advantages (green boxes) and disadvantages (red boxes) of the biomarkers that are currently most widely used in clinical trials.
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Figure 1: Advantages (green boxes) and disadvantages (red boxes) of the biomarkers that are currently most widely used in clinical trials.

Mentions: Today, the biomarkers used most extensively in clinical trials for dementia and to some extent in clinical practice are structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), molecular imaging of amyloid deposition using positron emission tomography (PET), imaging of metabolism using fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG)-PET, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures of Aβ and tau. However, structural changes measured using MRI are most likely relatively late events in the disease course and PET imaging is relatively expensive and limited in availability. Moreover, structural MRI and FDG-PET are not direct measures of the core pathological hallmarks of AD (Aβ and tau) and may, therefore, be relatively non-specific for AD in some cases (5) (Figure 1).


Blood-Based Proteomic Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

Baird AL, Westwood S, Lovestone S - Front Neurol (2015)

Advantages (green boxes) and disadvantages (red boxes) of the biomarkers that are currently most widely used in clinical trials.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644785&req=5

Figure 1: Advantages (green boxes) and disadvantages (red boxes) of the biomarkers that are currently most widely used in clinical trials.
Mentions: Today, the biomarkers used most extensively in clinical trials for dementia and to some extent in clinical practice are structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), molecular imaging of amyloid deposition using positron emission tomography (PET), imaging of metabolism using fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG)-PET, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures of Aβ and tau. However, structural changes measured using MRI are most likely relatively late events in the disease course and PET imaging is relatively expensive and limited in availability. Moreover, structural MRI and FDG-PET are not direct measures of the core pathological hallmarks of AD (Aβ and tau) and may, therefore, be relatively non-specific for AD in some cases (5) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease.Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various "omics" approaches in order to achieve this.This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford , Oxford , UK.

ABSTRACT
The complexity of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its long prodromal phase poses challenges for early diagnosis and yet allows for the possibility of the development of disease modifying treatments for secondary prevention. It is, therefore, of importance to develop biomarkers, in particular, in the preclinical or early phases that reflect the pathological characteristics of the disease and, moreover, could be of utility in triaging subjects for preventative therapeutic clinical trials. Much research has sought biomarkers for diagnostic purposes by comparing affected people to unaffected controls. However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease. Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various "omics" approaches in order to achieve this. This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus