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Nanopesticides and Nanofertilizers: Emerging Contaminants or Opportunities for Risk Mitigation?

Kah M - Front Chem (2015)

Bottom Line: A number of key (and sometimes controversial) questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that will soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they can fit into current regulatory and commercial frameworks.Issues related to the differences in definitions and perceptions within different sectors are discussed, as well as our current ability to assess new risks and benefits relative to conventional products.This analysis identifies directions for future research and regulatory needs in order to encourage intelligent design and promote the development of more sustainable agrochemicals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Research into nanotechnology applications for use in agriculture has become increasingly popular over the past decade, with a particular interest in developing novel nanoagrochemicals in the form of so-called "nanopesticides" and "nanofertilizers." In view of the extensive body of scientific literature available on the topic, many authors have foreseen a revolution in current agricultural practices. This perspective integrates scientific, regulatory, public and commercial viewpoints, and aims at critically evaluating progress made over the last decade. A number of key (and sometimes controversial) questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that will soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they can fit into current regulatory and commercial frameworks. Issues related to the differences in definitions and perceptions within different sectors are discussed, as well as our current ability to assess new risks and benefits relative to conventional products. Many nanoagrochemicals resemble products used currently, which raises the question whether the effect of formulation has been sufficiently taken into account when evaluating agrochemicals. This analysis identifies directions for future research and regulatory needs in order to encourage intelligent design and promote the development of more sustainable agrochemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activities carried out over the last decade were intense, but fragmented by sectors, with only limited interactions (represented with the arrows) between the research sphere, governmental, and non-governmental organizations, industry, and the public.
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Figure 1: Activities carried out over the last decade were intense, but fragmented by sectors, with only limited interactions (represented with the arrows) between the research sphere, governmental, and non-governmental organizations, industry, and the public.

Mentions: After briefly summarizing the activities related to nanoagrochemicals undertaken over the last decade (Figure 1), a number of key questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that may soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they fit into the current regulatory and commercial frameworks. Viewpoints from the scientific, industrial, and regulatory spheres are integrated to discuss what the future of nanoagrochemicals may look like. Finally, future directions are suggested that may allow the agrochemical sector to take advantage of nanotechnology, and possibly reduce its impact on human and environmental health.


Nanopesticides and Nanofertilizers: Emerging Contaminants or Opportunities for Risk Mitigation?

Kah M - Front Chem (2015)

Activities carried out over the last decade were intense, but fragmented by sectors, with only limited interactions (represented with the arrows) between the research sphere, governmental, and non-governmental organizations, industry, and the public.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644784&req=5

Figure 1: Activities carried out over the last decade were intense, but fragmented by sectors, with only limited interactions (represented with the arrows) between the research sphere, governmental, and non-governmental organizations, industry, and the public.
Mentions: After briefly summarizing the activities related to nanoagrochemicals undertaken over the last decade (Figure 1), a number of key questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that may soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they fit into the current regulatory and commercial frameworks. Viewpoints from the scientific, industrial, and regulatory spheres are integrated to discuss what the future of nanoagrochemicals may look like. Finally, future directions are suggested that may allow the agrochemical sector to take advantage of nanotechnology, and possibly reduce its impact on human and environmental health.

Bottom Line: A number of key (and sometimes controversial) questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that will soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they can fit into current regulatory and commercial frameworks.Issues related to the differences in definitions and perceptions within different sectors are discussed, as well as our current ability to assess new risks and benefits relative to conventional products.This analysis identifies directions for future research and regulatory needs in order to encourage intelligent design and promote the development of more sustainable agrochemicals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Research into nanotechnology applications for use in agriculture has become increasingly popular over the past decade, with a particular interest in developing novel nanoagrochemicals in the form of so-called "nanopesticides" and "nanofertilizers." In view of the extensive body of scientific literature available on the topic, many authors have foreseen a revolution in current agricultural practices. This perspective integrates scientific, regulatory, public and commercial viewpoints, and aims at critically evaluating progress made over the last decade. A number of key (and sometimes controversial) questions are addressed with the aim of identifying the products that will soon emerge on the market and analyzing how they can fit into current regulatory and commercial frameworks. Issues related to the differences in definitions and perceptions within different sectors are discussed, as well as our current ability to assess new risks and benefits relative to conventional products. Many nanoagrochemicals resemble products used currently, which raises the question whether the effect of formulation has been sufficiently taken into account when evaluating agrochemicals. This analysis identifies directions for future research and regulatory needs in order to encourage intelligent design and promote the development of more sustainable agrochemicals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus