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Nutritional aspect of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: its clinical importance.

Kim S, Koh H - Korean J Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract.The incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing worldwide, and a number of patients are diagnosed during their childhood or adolescence.Aside from controlling the gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional aspects such as growth, bone mineral density, anemia, micronutrient deficiency, hair loss, and diet should also be closely monitored and managed by the pediatric IBD team especially since the patients are in the development phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Severance Children's Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing worldwide, and a number of patients are diagnosed during their childhood or adolescence. Aside from controlling the gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional aspects such as growth, bone mineral density, anemia, micronutrient deficiency, hair loss, and diet should also be closely monitored and managed by the pediatric IBD team especially since the patients are in the development phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A comparison of the differences (Δ) in nutritional status among patients with severe Crohn disease at the initial enrollment and following 1 year of treatment between patients treated with and without supportive short-term partial enteral nutrition (SPEN), respectively. *P<0.05. SPEN were performed for 1 month after induction treatment. Micronutrients levels improved in both groups with larger increases observed in the SPEN group. Adapted from Kang Y, et al. Gut Liver 2015;9:87-93, according to open access policy of Gut and Liver33).
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Figure 2: A comparison of the differences (Δ) in nutritional status among patients with severe Crohn disease at the initial enrollment and following 1 year of treatment between patients treated with and without supportive short-term partial enteral nutrition (SPEN), respectively. *P<0.05. SPEN were performed for 1 month after induction treatment. Micronutrients levels improved in both groups with larger increases observed in the SPEN group. Adapted from Kang Y, et al. Gut Liver 2015;9:87-93, according to open access policy of Gut and Liver33).

Mentions: Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is recognized as an effective treatment strategy for pediatric Crohn disease. This therapeutic method is accomplished by supplying nutritional liquid formula without feeding the normal diet for several weeks. EEN is now recognized as a major form of therapy for pediatric Crohn disease patients and is recommended as a first line therapy for remission induction30). There is insufficient data on EEN among Korean patients. Although Suh et al.31) demonstrated the efficacy of EEN in Korean patients with Crohn disease, futher extensive long term studies are required. The mechanism of EEN is not exactly understood and several hypotheses have been considered. Gut rest and reduction of food antigens are believed to be one of these mechanisms. EEN is believed to modulate the intestinal microbiota in order to render it favorable for the noninflamed intestine. Several studies have demonstrated reductions in the proinflammatory cytokines and enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory proteins in patients treated with EEN32). Although EEN is a safe and effective treatment option, there is low acceptability due to exclusion of a normal diet. Partial enteral nutrition (PEN), which supplies liquid nutritional formula in addition to a normal diet, is ineffective for remission induction. Nevertheless, one report recently demonstrated the nutritional and clinical benefits of PEN33) (Fig. 2).


Nutritional aspect of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: its clinical importance.

Kim S, Koh H - Korean J Pediatr (2015)

A comparison of the differences (Δ) in nutritional status among patients with severe Crohn disease at the initial enrollment and following 1 year of treatment between patients treated with and without supportive short-term partial enteral nutrition (SPEN), respectively. *P<0.05. SPEN were performed for 1 month after induction treatment. Micronutrients levels improved in both groups with larger increases observed in the SPEN group. Adapted from Kang Y, et al. Gut Liver 2015;9:87-93, according to open access policy of Gut and Liver33).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644763&req=5

Figure 2: A comparison of the differences (Δ) in nutritional status among patients with severe Crohn disease at the initial enrollment and following 1 year of treatment between patients treated with and without supportive short-term partial enteral nutrition (SPEN), respectively. *P<0.05. SPEN were performed for 1 month after induction treatment. Micronutrients levels improved in both groups with larger increases observed in the SPEN group. Adapted from Kang Y, et al. Gut Liver 2015;9:87-93, according to open access policy of Gut and Liver33).
Mentions: Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is recognized as an effective treatment strategy for pediatric Crohn disease. This therapeutic method is accomplished by supplying nutritional liquid formula without feeding the normal diet for several weeks. EEN is now recognized as a major form of therapy for pediatric Crohn disease patients and is recommended as a first line therapy for remission induction30). There is insufficient data on EEN among Korean patients. Although Suh et al.31) demonstrated the efficacy of EEN in Korean patients with Crohn disease, futher extensive long term studies are required. The mechanism of EEN is not exactly understood and several hypotheses have been considered. Gut rest and reduction of food antigens are believed to be one of these mechanisms. EEN is believed to modulate the intestinal microbiota in order to render it favorable for the noninflamed intestine. Several studies have demonstrated reductions in the proinflammatory cytokines and enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory proteins in patients treated with EEN32). Although EEN is a safe and effective treatment option, there is low acceptability due to exclusion of a normal diet. Partial enteral nutrition (PEN), which supplies liquid nutritional formula in addition to a normal diet, is ineffective for remission induction. Nevertheless, one report recently demonstrated the nutritional and clinical benefits of PEN33) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract.The incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing worldwide, and a number of patients are diagnosed during their childhood or adolescence.Aside from controlling the gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional aspects such as growth, bone mineral density, anemia, micronutrient deficiency, hair loss, and diet should also be closely monitored and managed by the pediatric IBD team especially since the patients are in the development phase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Severance Children's Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing worldwide, and a number of patients are diagnosed during their childhood or adolescence. Aside from controlling the gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional aspects such as growth, bone mineral density, anemia, micronutrient deficiency, hair loss, and diet should also be closely monitored and managed by the pediatric IBD team especially since the patients are in the development phase.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus