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Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications.

You JS, Chung YE, Baek SE, Chung SP, Kim MJ - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events.Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema.Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 06273, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

53-year-old woman who underwent liposuction 3 days previously.She had no symptoms at liposuction site or abdominal wall. A, B. On ultrasonography, heterogeneous hyperechoic area (arrowheads) compared with adjacent normal fat (asterisk) is seen in subcutaneous layer of abdominal wall. Abdominal muscle is seen below lesion (arrows). C. On non-contrast axial CT image, infiltrative lesion with fluid collection or lymphoedema is seen in subcutaneous area (arrowheads). D. Subcutaneous emphysema (arrows) is also seen in subcutaneous layer.
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Figure 2: 53-year-old woman who underwent liposuction 3 days previously.She had no symptoms at liposuction site or abdominal wall. A, B. On ultrasonography, heterogeneous hyperechoic area (arrowheads) compared with adjacent normal fat (asterisk) is seen in subcutaneous layer of abdominal wall. Abdominal muscle is seen below lesion (arrows). C. On non-contrast axial CT image, infiltrative lesion with fluid collection or lymphoedema is seen in subcutaneous area (arrowheads). D. Subcutaneous emphysema (arrows) is also seen in subcutaneous layer.

Mentions: During liposuction, the cannula is inserted into the subcutaneous layer, and sometimes, water or vasoconstrictor solutions are also administered. Immediately after the liposuction, the surgery site appears as a heterogeneous hyperechoic or hypoechoic mass-like lesion on ultrasonography (15). On computed tomography (CT), an infiltrative lesion with fluid collection, or lymphoedema, with or without air bubbles, can be seen in the subcutaneous layer (Fig. 2) (516). Thin, linear radiating lesions perpendicular to the skin may also be present (5). Cannula insertion tracks can be seen as thick linear lesions parallel to the skin (16).


Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications.

You JS, Chung YE, Baek SE, Chung SP, Kim MJ - Korean J Radiol (2015)

53-year-old woman who underwent liposuction 3 days previously.She had no symptoms at liposuction site or abdominal wall. A, B. On ultrasonography, heterogeneous hyperechoic area (arrowheads) compared with adjacent normal fat (asterisk) is seen in subcutaneous layer of abdominal wall. Abdominal muscle is seen below lesion (arrows). C. On non-contrast axial CT image, infiltrative lesion with fluid collection or lymphoedema is seen in subcutaneous area (arrowheads). D. Subcutaneous emphysema (arrows) is also seen in subcutaneous layer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644740&req=5

Figure 2: 53-year-old woman who underwent liposuction 3 days previously.She had no symptoms at liposuction site or abdominal wall. A, B. On ultrasonography, heterogeneous hyperechoic area (arrowheads) compared with adjacent normal fat (asterisk) is seen in subcutaneous layer of abdominal wall. Abdominal muscle is seen below lesion (arrows). C. On non-contrast axial CT image, infiltrative lesion with fluid collection or lymphoedema is seen in subcutaneous area (arrowheads). D. Subcutaneous emphysema (arrows) is also seen in subcutaneous layer.
Mentions: During liposuction, the cannula is inserted into the subcutaneous layer, and sometimes, water or vasoconstrictor solutions are also administered. Immediately after the liposuction, the surgery site appears as a heterogeneous hyperechoic or hypoechoic mass-like lesion on ultrasonography (15). On computed tomography (CT), an infiltrative lesion with fluid collection, or lymphoedema, with or without air bubbles, can be seen in the subcutaneous layer (Fig. 2) (516). Thin, linear radiating lesions perpendicular to the skin may also be present (5). Cannula insertion tracks can be seen as thick linear lesions parallel to the skin (16).

Bottom Line: These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events.Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema.Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 06273, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus