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Metastatic Spermatic Cord Tumor From Colorectal Cancer.

Jang JG, Jeong HY, Kim KS, Park MJ, Lee JS, Kim SS, Kim HY - Ann Coloproctol (2015)

Bottom Line: Metastatic tumors of the spermatic cord are extremely rare, and the prognosis for patients is typically poor.The patient complained of groin discomfort with a tender mass in the right inguinal area.The pathologic finding for rectum revealed a mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Good Samsun Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Metastatic tumors of the spermatic cord are extremely rare, and the prognosis for patients is typically poor. In the majority of cases, the primary tumor occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 62-year-old man with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor. The patient complained of groin discomfort with a tender mass in the right inguinal area. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the pathologic finding was a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. We performed a systemic evaluation including colonoscopy, abdominal computed tomography, and total-body positron emission tomography, and the primary tumor was confirmed to involve the total colon, including the cecum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. The pathologic finding for rectum revealed a mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Positron emission tomography shows an unusual fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the cecum serosa (arrows).
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Figure 4: Positron emission tomography shows an unusual fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the cecum serosa (arrows).

Mentions: A male patient, 62 years old, visited Good Samsun Hospital with a chief complaint of a right inguinal region mass accompanied by pain for the previous 3 months. He had no special history of disease; however, the year before his visit to our hospital, he had undergone hernia surgery due to an indolent fixed mass in the right inguinal region. On physical examination, his vital signs were stable, and a hard, fixed mass, accompanied by oppressive pain, with a size of 1 cm × 1 cm was felt in the right inguinal region. The patient's progress was observed for a month during which time an anti-inflammatory analgesic drug was administered to distinguish the oppressive pain from that which might have been generated by the previous hernia surgery. The biopsy of the spermatic cord showed a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma (Fig. 1A). The image showed a thickening of the right spermatic cord, and infiltration around soft tissues was confirmed by using the scrotal sonography (Fig. 2). In addition, abdominal computed tomography indicated infiltration of the proximal sigmoid colon and rectum, as well as a diffuse peritoneal seeding metastasis (Fig. 3A, B). A tumor accompanied by redness was observed in the rectum during the colonoscopy, and a core needle biopsy was conducted on that tumor. A mucinous adenocarcinoma that was identical to tissue previously taken from the spermatic cord was diagnosed based on the biopsy result (Fig. 1B). Positron emission tomography (PET) (Fig. 4) confirmed infiltration of the sigmoid colon, rectum, and cecum.


Metastatic Spermatic Cord Tumor From Colorectal Cancer.

Jang JG, Jeong HY, Kim KS, Park MJ, Lee JS, Kim SS, Kim HY - Ann Coloproctol (2015)

Positron emission tomography shows an unusual fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the cecum serosa (arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644709&req=5

Figure 4: Positron emission tomography shows an unusual fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the cecum serosa (arrows).
Mentions: A male patient, 62 years old, visited Good Samsun Hospital with a chief complaint of a right inguinal region mass accompanied by pain for the previous 3 months. He had no special history of disease; however, the year before his visit to our hospital, he had undergone hernia surgery due to an indolent fixed mass in the right inguinal region. On physical examination, his vital signs were stable, and a hard, fixed mass, accompanied by oppressive pain, with a size of 1 cm × 1 cm was felt in the right inguinal region. The patient's progress was observed for a month during which time an anti-inflammatory analgesic drug was administered to distinguish the oppressive pain from that which might have been generated by the previous hernia surgery. The biopsy of the spermatic cord showed a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma (Fig. 1A). The image showed a thickening of the right spermatic cord, and infiltration around soft tissues was confirmed by using the scrotal sonography (Fig. 2). In addition, abdominal computed tomography indicated infiltration of the proximal sigmoid colon and rectum, as well as a diffuse peritoneal seeding metastasis (Fig. 3A, B). A tumor accompanied by redness was observed in the rectum during the colonoscopy, and a core needle biopsy was conducted on that tumor. A mucinous adenocarcinoma that was identical to tissue previously taken from the spermatic cord was diagnosed based on the biopsy result (Fig. 1B). Positron emission tomography (PET) (Fig. 4) confirmed infiltration of the sigmoid colon, rectum, and cecum.

Bottom Line: Metastatic tumors of the spermatic cord are extremely rare, and the prognosis for patients is typically poor.The patient complained of groin discomfort with a tender mass in the right inguinal area.The pathologic finding for rectum revealed a mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Good Samsun Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Metastatic tumors of the spermatic cord are extremely rare, and the prognosis for patients is typically poor. In the majority of cases, the primary tumor occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 62-year-old man with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor. The patient complained of groin discomfort with a tender mass in the right inguinal area. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the pathologic finding was a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. We performed a systemic evaluation including colonoscopy, abdominal computed tomography, and total-body positron emission tomography, and the primary tumor was confirmed to involve the total colon, including the cecum, sigmoid colon, and rectum. The pathologic finding for rectum revealed a mucinous adenocarcinoma compatible with a metastatic spermatic cord tumor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus