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Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

Li B, Jackson SA, Gangiredla J, Wang W, Liu H, Tall BD, Beaubrun JJ, Jay-Russell M, Vellidis G, Elkins CA - Appl. Environ. Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Newport III).Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment.These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. FDA, Laurel, Maryland, USA baoguang.li@fda.hhs.gov.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hierarchical clustering of RMA-summarized microarray data employing a database of over 760 Salmonella reference strains and outbreak strains from DMB, FDA, collections integrated with 56 isolates analyzed in this study. The resulting dendrogram represents a large comprehensive phylogenic tree which can be viewed in Fig. S2 in the supplemental material. Using the same strategy, a streamlined cluster dendrogram was generated among the 56 isolates analyzed by microarray analysis.
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Figure 3: Hierarchical clustering of RMA-summarized microarray data employing a database of over 760 Salmonella reference strains and outbreak strains from DMB, FDA, collections integrated with 56 isolates analyzed in this study. The resulting dendrogram represents a large comprehensive phylogenic tree which can be viewed in Fig. S2 in the supplemental material. Using the same strategy, a streamlined cluster dendrogram was generated among the 56 isolates analyzed by microarray analysis.

Mentions: The microarray data on the examined isolates were compared with our in-house FDA DMB microarray database. Serovars of the 56 Salmonella isolates recovered from the irrigation ponds were determined by microarray analysis, and all the isolates were successfully subtyped, resulting in 53 strains (three pairs of isolates were identified as the same strain) (Table 1); a cluster dendrogram among the 56 isolates analyzed was then generated by microarray analysis (Fig. 3). The majority of the isolates were S. Newport, accounting for 54.7% (29/53), and the second most common serovar was S. Enteritidis, accounting for 11.3% (6/53); these were followed by S. Muenchen and S. Javiana, each accounting for 7.5% (4/53). There were two isolates identified as S. Thompson, two isolates identified as S. enterica subsp. diarizonae, and two isolates identified as S. Saintpaul, each accounting for 3.8% (2/53). Isolates of other serovars included S. Bareilly, S. Montevideo, S. Inverness, and S. Drypool (Table 1).


Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

Li B, Jackson SA, Gangiredla J, Wang W, Liu H, Tall BD, Beaubrun JJ, Jay-Russell M, Vellidis G, Elkins CA - Appl. Environ. Microbiol. (2015)

Hierarchical clustering of RMA-summarized microarray data employing a database of over 760 Salmonella reference strains and outbreak strains from DMB, FDA, collections integrated with 56 isolates analyzed in this study. The resulting dendrogram represents a large comprehensive phylogenic tree which can be viewed in Fig. S2 in the supplemental material. Using the same strategy, a streamlined cluster dendrogram was generated among the 56 isolates analyzed by microarray analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644655&req=5

Figure 3: Hierarchical clustering of RMA-summarized microarray data employing a database of over 760 Salmonella reference strains and outbreak strains from DMB, FDA, collections integrated with 56 isolates analyzed in this study. The resulting dendrogram represents a large comprehensive phylogenic tree which can be viewed in Fig. S2 in the supplemental material. Using the same strategy, a streamlined cluster dendrogram was generated among the 56 isolates analyzed by microarray analysis.
Mentions: The microarray data on the examined isolates were compared with our in-house FDA DMB microarray database. Serovars of the 56 Salmonella isolates recovered from the irrigation ponds were determined by microarray analysis, and all the isolates were successfully subtyped, resulting in 53 strains (three pairs of isolates were identified as the same strain) (Table 1); a cluster dendrogram among the 56 isolates analyzed was then generated by microarray analysis (Fig. 3). The majority of the isolates were S. Newport, accounting for 54.7% (29/53), and the second most common serovar was S. Enteritidis, accounting for 11.3% (6/53); these were followed by S. Muenchen and S. Javiana, each accounting for 7.5% (4/53). There were two isolates identified as S. Thompson, two isolates identified as S. enterica subsp. diarizonae, and two isolates identified as S. Saintpaul, each accounting for 3.8% (2/53). Isolates of other serovars included S. Bareilly, S. Montevideo, S. Inverness, and S. Drypool (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Newport III).Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment.These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. FDA, Laurel, Maryland, USA baoguang.li@fda.hhs.gov.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus