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Marital Quality Trajectory among Iranian Married Individuals: A Collectivist Perspective.

Ahmadi K, Saadat H - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The overall shape remains the same after adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement.Marital trajectory assumes a curvilinear pattern and has three periods of decline, stagnation, and decline.The shape of trajectory bears similarities to the observed patterns in the US but is distinct, nevertheless.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: The trajectory of marital quality over the life course assumes a curvilinear pattern and declines over time. However, most studies to date have been conducted in developed societies, leaving the generalizability of their findings open to skepticism. In this study, we aimed to delineate the trajectory of marital satisfaction in Iran.

Methods: Using cluster-sampling method, representative sample of 800 Iranian married individuals from urban areas of seven provinces of Iran, between February and May 2011 was surveyed. Each cluster included 50 households. Sealed packages containing survey material were delivered to households. Self-administered surveys included a checklist collecting demographic and socioeconomic data, and the Comprehensive Marital Satisfaction Scale. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to explicate the trajectory of marital satisfaction over marital duration.

Results: A total of 644 complete questionnaires were returned (response rate: 80.5%). Average age of the participants was 40yr and average duration of marriage 17yr. The fitted GAM showed that marital satisfaction is highest at the beginning but drastically declines over the first 10yr. After arriving a nadir, the downward progression is reversed in the next 10-15yr, reaching a level comparable to the beginning. At 23-25yr, a second declining wave initiates and marital satisfaction steadily declines thereafter. The overall shape remains the same after adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement.

Conclusion: Marital trajectory assumes a curvilinear pattern and has three periods of decline, stagnation, and decline. The shape of trajectory bears similarities to the observed patterns in the US but is distinct, nevertheless.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-linear spline for marital qualityTop left panel; Marital quality as the dependent variable and marriage duration, sex, and education as independent predictors (P=0.000012 for marriage duration, calculated df=4.09). /Top right panel; adjustment for number of children (P=0.000062, calculated df=4.08) / Bottom left panel; adjustment for number of children and economic status (P=0.000042, df=4.08)/ Bottom right panel; adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement status (P=0.000078, df=4.08)
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Figure 1: Non-linear spline for marital qualityTop left panel; Marital quality as the dependent variable and marriage duration, sex, and education as independent predictors (P=0.000012 for marriage duration, calculated df=4.09). /Top right panel; adjustment for number of children (P=0.000062, calculated df=4.08) / Bottom left panel; adjustment for number of children and economic status (P=0.000042, df=4.08)/ Bottom right panel; adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement status (P=0.000078, df=4.08)

Mentions: Mean age of participants was 40 years and ranged from 22 to 63. Response rate was slightly higher in women and women comprised 53.1% of participants in the final sample. Less than half of the surveyed population had at least some college education. Participants were married for an average of 17 years, ranging from 1 to 38. Average number of children was 2.3 and ranged from no children, to a maximum of seven children (observed in two households). Fitted GAM smoothed spline for marital satisfaction, adjusted for sex, and level of education is presented in Fig. 1 (top left panel). A complex curvilinear pattern is identifiable (nonlinear P=0.000012). According to the fitted curve, marital satisfaction is highest at the beginning of marriage but tends to decline with a sharp angle over the first 10 years. After reaching a nadir at about 10–12 years, the downward progression is reversed and satisfaction begins to recover in the next 10–15 years, ultimately reaching a level comparable to the beginning of the marriage. After about 23–25 years, a second declining wave emerges and marital satisfaction firmly declines with an unprecedented pace and continues to decline thereafter. The overall shape of the trajectory was retained after adjustment for possible confounding variables (Fig. 1, top right and bottom panels). After adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement the curvilinear pattern still contained the two declining periods, albeit diluted to some extent (non-linear P=0.000078).


Marital Quality Trajectory among Iranian Married Individuals: A Collectivist Perspective.

Ahmadi K, Saadat H - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

Non-linear spline for marital qualityTop left panel; Marital quality as the dependent variable and marriage duration, sex, and education as independent predictors (P=0.000012 for marriage duration, calculated df=4.09). /Top right panel; adjustment for number of children (P=0.000062, calculated df=4.08) / Bottom left panel; adjustment for number of children and economic status (P=0.000042, df=4.08)/ Bottom right panel; adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement status (P=0.000078, df=4.08)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644586&req=5

Figure 1: Non-linear spline for marital qualityTop left panel; Marital quality as the dependent variable and marriage duration, sex, and education as independent predictors (P=0.000012 for marriage duration, calculated df=4.09). /Top right panel; adjustment for number of children (P=0.000062, calculated df=4.08) / Bottom left panel; adjustment for number of children and economic status (P=0.000042, df=4.08)/ Bottom right panel; adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement status (P=0.000078, df=4.08)
Mentions: Mean age of participants was 40 years and ranged from 22 to 63. Response rate was slightly higher in women and women comprised 53.1% of participants in the final sample. Less than half of the surveyed population had at least some college education. Participants were married for an average of 17 years, ranging from 1 to 38. Average number of children was 2.3 and ranged from no children, to a maximum of seven children (observed in two households). Fitted GAM smoothed spline for marital satisfaction, adjusted for sex, and level of education is presented in Fig. 1 (top left panel). A complex curvilinear pattern is identifiable (nonlinear P=0.000012). According to the fitted curve, marital satisfaction is highest at the beginning of marriage but tends to decline with a sharp angle over the first 10 years. After reaching a nadir at about 10–12 years, the downward progression is reversed and satisfaction begins to recover in the next 10–15 years, ultimately reaching a level comparable to the beginning of the marriage. After about 23–25 years, a second declining wave emerges and marital satisfaction firmly declines with an unprecedented pace and continues to decline thereafter. The overall shape of the trajectory was retained after adjustment for possible confounding variables (Fig. 1, top right and bottom panels). After adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement the curvilinear pattern still contained the two declining periods, albeit diluted to some extent (non-linear P=0.000078).

Bottom Line: The overall shape remains the same after adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement.Marital trajectory assumes a curvilinear pattern and has three periods of decline, stagnation, and decline.The shape of trajectory bears similarities to the observed patterns in the US but is distinct, nevertheless.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: The trajectory of marital quality over the life course assumes a curvilinear pattern and declines over time. However, most studies to date have been conducted in developed societies, leaving the generalizability of their findings open to skepticism. In this study, we aimed to delineate the trajectory of marital satisfaction in Iran.

Methods: Using cluster-sampling method, representative sample of 800 Iranian married individuals from urban areas of seven provinces of Iran, between February and May 2011 was surveyed. Each cluster included 50 households. Sealed packages containing survey material were delivered to households. Self-administered surveys included a checklist collecting demographic and socioeconomic data, and the Comprehensive Marital Satisfaction Scale. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to explicate the trajectory of marital satisfaction over marital duration.

Results: A total of 644 complete questionnaires were returned (response rate: 80.5%). Average age of the participants was 40yr and average duration of marriage 17yr. The fitted GAM showed that marital satisfaction is highest at the beginning but drastically declines over the first 10yr. After arriving a nadir, the downward progression is reversed in the next 10-15yr, reaching a level comparable to the beginning. At 23-25yr, a second declining wave initiates and marital satisfaction steadily declines thereafter. The overall shape remains the same after adjustment for number of children, economic status, and retirement.

Conclusion: Marital trajectory assumes a curvilinear pattern and has three periods of decline, stagnation, and decline. The shape of trajectory bears similarities to the observed patterns in the US but is distinct, nevertheless.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus