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Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

Wu Y, Kwon YS, Labib M, Foran DJ, Singer EA - Dis. Markers (2015)

Bottom Line: As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health.Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC.We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biomedical Imaging & Informatics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA ; Department of Radiology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.

ABSTRACT
As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Conventional MRI provides anatomic but not physiologic information about kidney tumors. (a) 3 cm exophytic renal mass is imaged with conventional MRI that can only provide information about the size of a renal mass and its enhancement after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Based on its size, there is a 30% likelihood that it is benign. Percutaneous core needle biopsy determined that it was a renal cell carcinoma. (b) 7 cm endophytic renal mass with para-aortic lymphadenopathy indicated by the red arrow.
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fig1: Conventional MRI provides anatomic but not physiologic information about kidney tumors. (a) 3 cm exophytic renal mass is imaged with conventional MRI that can only provide information about the size of a renal mass and its enhancement after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Based on its size, there is a 30% likelihood that it is benign. Percutaneous core needle biopsy determined that it was a renal cell carcinoma. (b) 7 cm endophytic renal mass with para-aortic lymphadenopathy indicated by the red arrow.

Mentions: Traditionally, computed tomography (CT) has been considered the gold standard for imaging of renal masses since the 1990s and the utility of multiphasic multidetector CT has been described in differentiating clear-cell RCC from other histologic subtypes [4]. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also been used with at least comparable or even better sensitivity [5]. Willatt et al. suggest that a previously considered indeterminate lesion on CT imaging can be better evaluated with MRI for tumor characteristics consistent with malignancy [6]. This is important as 30–40% of small renal masses (SRM) ≤ 4 cm and up to 20% of masses ≤7 cm are benign [7]. A conventional MRI image of a patient with a SRM is shown in Figure 1(a).


Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

Wu Y, Kwon YS, Labib M, Foran DJ, Singer EA - Dis. Markers (2015)

Conventional MRI provides anatomic but not physiologic information about kidney tumors. (a) 3 cm exophytic renal mass is imaged with conventional MRI that can only provide information about the size of a renal mass and its enhancement after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Based on its size, there is a 30% likelihood that it is benign. Percutaneous core needle biopsy determined that it was a renal cell carcinoma. (b) 7 cm endophytic renal mass with para-aortic lymphadenopathy indicated by the red arrow.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644550&req=5

fig1: Conventional MRI provides anatomic but not physiologic information about kidney tumors. (a) 3 cm exophytic renal mass is imaged with conventional MRI that can only provide information about the size of a renal mass and its enhancement after administration of gadolinium-based contrast agent. Based on its size, there is a 30% likelihood that it is benign. Percutaneous core needle biopsy determined that it was a renal cell carcinoma. (b) 7 cm endophytic renal mass with para-aortic lymphadenopathy indicated by the red arrow.
Mentions: Traditionally, computed tomography (CT) has been considered the gold standard for imaging of renal masses since the 1990s and the utility of multiphasic multidetector CT has been described in differentiating clear-cell RCC from other histologic subtypes [4]. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also been used with at least comparable or even better sensitivity [5]. Willatt et al. suggest that a previously considered indeterminate lesion on CT imaging can be better evaluated with MRI for tumor characteristics consistent with malignancy [6]. This is important as 30–40% of small renal masses (SRM) ≤ 4 cm and up to 20% of masses ≤7 cm are benign [7]. A conventional MRI image of a patient with a SRM is shown in Figure 1(a).

Bottom Line: As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health.Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC.We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biomedical Imaging & Informatics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA ; Department of Radiology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.

ABSTRACT
As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus