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Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography.

Chen H, Yuan Z, Wu C - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging.The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity.This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130012, China ; Bioimaging Core, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ICG-loaded droplets. (i) Blank droplets in water, (ii) ICG-loaded droplets in water, and (iii) blank droplets in aqueous ICG. The right panel plotted the mean photoacoustic intensity identified in the defined ROI. Error bar represents the mean ± standard deviation. N ≥ 3 for all reported values; scale bar = 2 mm. Reproduced with permission from [23].
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fig4: Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ICG-loaded droplets. (i) Blank droplets in water, (ii) ICG-loaded droplets in water, and (iii) blank droplets in aqueous ICG. The right panel plotted the mean photoacoustic intensity identified in the defined ROI. Error bar represents the mean ± standard deviation. N ≥ 3 for all reported values; scale bar = 2 mm. Reproduced with permission from [23].

Mentions: Over the last few years, perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets have been developed into powerful probes for optical molecular imaging as well as image-guided treatments [71, 72]. For instance, high-intensity ultrasound pulses have been used to generate gas microbubbles according to the phase transitions of liquid PFC. Newly, PFC nanodroplets with encapsulated plasmonic nanoparticles were developed as probes for PAT [73]. In terms of accelerated clinical translation, Hannah et al. developed ICG-loaded PFC nanodroplets, which are identified as nontoxic, biocompatible, and safe materials [23]. The contrast enhancement via droplet vaporization was observed for PAT after the initial laser pulse, and the mean signals were determined over several pulses (Figure 4). They also evaluated the quality enhancement of PAT via the analysis of imaging contrast. Upon irradiation, the PA image contrast was 36 (au), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 51 dB when compared to the 1.1 (au) and 19 dB from blank droplets. They also investigated how the increased ambient temperature would affect the change of PAT imaging contrast. They found that, with increased temperatures, the nanodroplets will generate enhanced photoacoustic signals upon vaporization.


Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography.

Chen H, Yuan Z, Wu C - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ICG-loaded droplets. (i) Blank droplets in water, (ii) ICG-loaded droplets in water, and (iii) blank droplets in aqueous ICG. The right panel plotted the mean photoacoustic intensity identified in the defined ROI. Error bar represents the mean ± standard deviation. N ≥ 3 for all reported values; scale bar = 2 mm. Reproduced with permission from [23].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644549&req=5

fig4: Photoacoustic molecular imaging of ICG-loaded droplets. (i) Blank droplets in water, (ii) ICG-loaded droplets in water, and (iii) blank droplets in aqueous ICG. The right panel plotted the mean photoacoustic intensity identified in the defined ROI. Error bar represents the mean ± standard deviation. N ≥ 3 for all reported values; scale bar = 2 mm. Reproduced with permission from [23].
Mentions: Over the last few years, perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets have been developed into powerful probes for optical molecular imaging as well as image-guided treatments [71, 72]. For instance, high-intensity ultrasound pulses have been used to generate gas microbubbles according to the phase transitions of liquid PFC. Newly, PFC nanodroplets with encapsulated plasmonic nanoparticles were developed as probes for PAT [73]. In terms of accelerated clinical translation, Hannah et al. developed ICG-loaded PFC nanodroplets, which are identified as nontoxic, biocompatible, and safe materials [23]. The contrast enhancement via droplet vaporization was observed for PAT after the initial laser pulse, and the mean signals were determined over several pulses (Figure 4). They also evaluated the quality enhancement of PAT via the analysis of imaging contrast. Upon irradiation, the PA image contrast was 36 (au), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 51 dB when compared to the 1.1 (au) and 19 dB from blank droplets. They also investigated how the increased ambient temperature would affect the change of PAT imaging contrast. They found that, with increased temperatures, the nanodroplets will generate enhanced photoacoustic signals upon vaporization.

Bottom Line: Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging.The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity.This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130012, China ; Bioimaging Core, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus