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Type VI Aplasia Cutis Congenita: Bart's Syndrome.

Kulalı F, Bas AY, Kale Y, Celik IH, Demirel N, Apaydın S - Case Rep Dermatol Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Bart's syndrome (BS) is diagnosed clinically based on the disorder's unique signs and symptoms but histologic evaluation of the skin can help to confirm the final diagnosis.The patient was managed conservatively with topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing.Periodic follow-up examinations showed complete healing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neonatology, Etlik Zübeyde Hanim Women's Health Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Bart's syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and epidermolysis bullosa. We present the case of a newborn male who developed blisters on the mucous membranes and the skin following congenital localized absence of skin. Bart's syndrome (BS) is diagnosed clinically based on the disorder's unique signs and symptoms but histologic evaluation of the skin can help to confirm the final diagnosis. The patient was managed conservatively with topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing. Periodic follow-up examinations showed complete healing. We emphasized that it is important to use relatively simple methods for optimal healing without the need for complex surgical interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Healing of the lesions with conservative treatment.
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fig4: Healing of the lesions with conservative treatment.

Mentions: The use of prophylactic systemic antibiotics in therapy has not been recommended. We used topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing in our patient. Sterile dressings with Bactigras of the lesions were done twice daily. Epithelialization process on the lesions was noted on the tenth day of hospital stay and the infant was discharged. As shown in Figure 4, the wound healing in this patient is rapid, efficient, and perfect.


Type VI Aplasia Cutis Congenita: Bart's Syndrome.

Kulalı F, Bas AY, Kale Y, Celik IH, Demirel N, Apaydın S - Case Rep Dermatol Med (2015)

Healing of the lesions with conservative treatment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644546&req=5

fig4: Healing of the lesions with conservative treatment.
Mentions: The use of prophylactic systemic antibiotics in therapy has not been recommended. We used topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing in our patient. Sterile dressings with Bactigras of the lesions were done twice daily. Epithelialization process on the lesions was noted on the tenth day of hospital stay and the infant was discharged. As shown in Figure 4, the wound healing in this patient is rapid, efficient, and perfect.

Bottom Line: Bart's syndrome (BS) is diagnosed clinically based on the disorder's unique signs and symptoms but histologic evaluation of the skin can help to confirm the final diagnosis.The patient was managed conservatively with topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing.Periodic follow-up examinations showed complete healing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neonatology, Etlik Zübeyde Hanim Women's Health Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Bart's syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and epidermolysis bullosa. We present the case of a newborn male who developed blisters on the mucous membranes and the skin following congenital localized absence of skin. Bart's syndrome (BS) is diagnosed clinically based on the disorder's unique signs and symptoms but histologic evaluation of the skin can help to confirm the final diagnosis. The patient was managed conservatively with topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing. Periodic follow-up examinations showed complete healing. We emphasized that it is important to use relatively simple methods for optimal healing without the need for complex surgical interventions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus