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Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.

Namork E, Stensby BA - Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol (2015)

Bottom Line: Serum samples negative to the above allergens were analyzed for sIgE to Ara h 6, and sIgE to Pru p 3 in peach were analyzed in sera positive to the cross-reactive allergen Ara h 9.Highest frequency of sIgE to Ara h 2, often co-sensitized to Ara h 1 and 3, were found in the small children up to 6 years of age.The sIgE levels to the storage proteins Ara h 1, 2 and 3 were strongly correlated, as was the sIgE levels to Ara h 8 and birch pollen extract.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, 0403 Oslo, Norway ; Lovisenberggata 8, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peanuts contain potent food allergens and the prevalence of allergy is reported to increase, especially in children. Since peanut sensitization may differ between different geographical regions, we wanted to investigate the sensitization pattern to the individual peanut allergens in a Norwegian population.

Methods: Cases reported to the Norwegian Food Allergy Register with sera positive to peanut extract were analyzed for specific IgE (sIgE) to the recombinant peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 8 and Ara h 9 and to birch pollen extract. Serum samples negative to the above allergens were analyzed for sIgE to Ara h 6, and sIgE to Pru p 3 in peach were analyzed in sera positive to the cross-reactive allergen Ara h 9.

Results: Highest frequency of sIgE to Ara h 2, often co-sensitized to Ara h 1 and 3, were found in the small children up to 6 years of age. From the age of 6 years, sensitization to Ara h 8 was predominant. The sIgE levels to the storage proteins Ara h 1, 2 and 3 were strongly correlated, as was the sIgE levels to Ara h 8 and birch pollen extract. A low sensitization rate of sIgE to Ara h 9 in young adults was observed, which sIgE levels were very strongly correlated to Pru p 3.

Conclusion: The sensitization to peanut allergens in a Norwegian population shows a clear age dependent pattern. The results add to the previously published research on the sensitization patterns of peanut sensitized patients in different geographical areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of patients with peanut specific IgE show four age groups; 0–5 years, 6–25 years, 26–45 years and 46–80 years of age
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Fig1: Age distribution of patients with peanut specific IgE show four age groups; 0–5 years, 6–25 years, 26–45 years and 46–80 years of age

Mentions: Frequency analysis of the ages of the 214 patients sensitized to peanut showed four age groups (Fig. 1). As seen from the figure, the frequency of sensitization peaked at ages 0–5 years, the second group comprised the ages from 6 to 25 years, the third group from 26 to 45 years and the lowest frequency of sensitization was seen for the ages 46 to 80 years. The gender distribution shifted from 76:24 % males:females in the small children’s group to 23:77 % males:females in the oldest group (Table 1). The onset of reaction reported to occur within 1 h after intake of the suspected food was highest in the youngest group, 97 %, and decreased by age to 69 % in the oldest group (Table 1). The organ systems reported to be most often affected were symptoms in the skin (urticaria, and angioedema, sudden itching of eyes and nose), most often in combination with gastrointestinal tract (oral pruritus, lip swelling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting) and/or respiratory symptoms (rhinorrhea, wheezing, chest tightness, cough, stridor, dyspnoe, and respiratory arrest). Patients reported to have symptoms affecting more than one organ system, which is related to high risk of severe reactions, were highest in the youngest age group, 76.7 %, declining with age to 54.5 % in the oldest age group (Table 1). The four age groups also differed in that severe skin symptoms were more often reported and loss of consciousness less reported in the youngest children. Cardiac arrest was not reported for the youngest and the oldest age groups. The therapeutic treatment employed was reported to be antihistamines alone (23.5 %), in combination with steroids (24.1 %) or most commonly in a combination of both epinephrine and steroids (32.1 %). Epinephrine alone and steroids alone was used in 14.2 and 6.2 % of the reported cases, respectively.Fig. 1


Peanut sensitization pattern in Norwegian children and adults with specific IgE to peanut show age related differences.

Namork E, Stensby BA - Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol (2015)

Age distribution of patients with peanut specific IgE show four age groups; 0–5 years, 6–25 years, 26–45 years and 46–80 years of age
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644336&req=5

Fig1: Age distribution of patients with peanut specific IgE show four age groups; 0–5 years, 6–25 years, 26–45 years and 46–80 years of age
Mentions: Frequency analysis of the ages of the 214 patients sensitized to peanut showed four age groups (Fig. 1). As seen from the figure, the frequency of sensitization peaked at ages 0–5 years, the second group comprised the ages from 6 to 25 years, the third group from 26 to 45 years and the lowest frequency of sensitization was seen for the ages 46 to 80 years. The gender distribution shifted from 76:24 % males:females in the small children’s group to 23:77 % males:females in the oldest group (Table 1). The onset of reaction reported to occur within 1 h after intake of the suspected food was highest in the youngest group, 97 %, and decreased by age to 69 % in the oldest group (Table 1). The organ systems reported to be most often affected were symptoms in the skin (urticaria, and angioedema, sudden itching of eyes and nose), most often in combination with gastrointestinal tract (oral pruritus, lip swelling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting) and/or respiratory symptoms (rhinorrhea, wheezing, chest tightness, cough, stridor, dyspnoe, and respiratory arrest). Patients reported to have symptoms affecting more than one organ system, which is related to high risk of severe reactions, were highest in the youngest age group, 76.7 %, declining with age to 54.5 % in the oldest age group (Table 1). The four age groups also differed in that severe skin symptoms were more often reported and loss of consciousness less reported in the youngest children. Cardiac arrest was not reported for the youngest and the oldest age groups. The therapeutic treatment employed was reported to be antihistamines alone (23.5 %), in combination with steroids (24.1 %) or most commonly in a combination of both epinephrine and steroids (32.1 %). Epinephrine alone and steroids alone was used in 14.2 and 6.2 % of the reported cases, respectively.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Serum samples negative to the above allergens were analyzed for sIgE to Ara h 6, and sIgE to Pru p 3 in peach were analyzed in sera positive to the cross-reactive allergen Ara h 9.Highest frequency of sIgE to Ara h 2, often co-sensitized to Ara h 1 and 3, were found in the small children up to 6 years of age.The sIgE levels to the storage proteins Ara h 1, 2 and 3 were strongly correlated, as was the sIgE levels to Ara h 8 and birch pollen extract.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Environmental Medicine, Department of Food, Water and Cosmetics, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, 0403 Oslo, Norway ; Lovisenberggata 8, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: Peanuts contain potent food allergens and the prevalence of allergy is reported to increase, especially in children. Since peanut sensitization may differ between different geographical regions, we wanted to investigate the sensitization pattern to the individual peanut allergens in a Norwegian population.

Methods: Cases reported to the Norwegian Food Allergy Register with sera positive to peanut extract were analyzed for specific IgE (sIgE) to the recombinant peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 8 and Ara h 9 and to birch pollen extract. Serum samples negative to the above allergens were analyzed for sIgE to Ara h 6, and sIgE to Pru p 3 in peach were analyzed in sera positive to the cross-reactive allergen Ara h 9.

Results: Highest frequency of sIgE to Ara h 2, often co-sensitized to Ara h 1 and 3, were found in the small children up to 6 years of age. From the age of 6 years, sensitization to Ara h 8 was predominant. The sIgE levels to the storage proteins Ara h 1, 2 and 3 were strongly correlated, as was the sIgE levels to Ara h 8 and birch pollen extract. A low sensitization rate of sIgE to Ara h 9 in young adults was observed, which sIgE levels were very strongly correlated to Pru p 3.

Conclusion: The sensitization to peanut allergens in a Norwegian population shows a clear age dependent pattern. The results add to the previously published research on the sensitization patterns of peanut sensitized patients in different geographical areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus