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Can't stand the look in the mirror? Self-awareness avoidance in borderline personality disorder.

Winter D, Koplin K, Lis S - Borderline Personal Disord Emot Dysregul (2015)

Bottom Line: Results revealed altered reactions to self-awareness cues in BPD.While BPD patients avoided such a cue slightly more often, they were more often aware of their behavior than healthy participants.As possible explanations, a negative body related, shame-prone self-concept as well as a simultaneously increased degree of self-focused attention are suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) expect and perceive social rejection stronger than healthy individuals. Shifting ones attention from oneself to others has been suggested as a mechanism to deal with the experience of social rejection. Here, we investigated whether BPD participants avoid increased self-awareness and whether this is done intentionally.

Methods: Thirty BPD patients and 30 healthy control participants, all naïve of the study's purpose, were asked to choose either a seat facing a mirror (self-awareness) or not facing the mirror (avoidance of self-awareness). Afterwards they were asked to indicate if they have chosen the seat intentionally.

Results: BPD patients avoided as a trend the chair facing the mirror more often than healthy control participants. 90 % of the patients reported that they made their seating decision intentionally in contrast to 26.7 % of the healthy participants (odd ratio = 24.75).

Conclusions: Results revealed altered reactions to self-awareness cues in BPD. While BPD patients avoided such a cue slightly more often, they were more often aware of their behavior than healthy participants. As possible explanations, a negative body related, shame-prone self-concept as well as a simultaneously increased degree of self-focused attention are suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavioral Results. Results on the behavioral self-awareness avoidance reflected by the percentages of subjects choosing the chair not facing the mirror and the reported intentionality of this choice. BPD = borderline personality disorder, HC = healthy control participants
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Fig2: Behavioral Results. Results on the behavioral self-awareness avoidance reflected by the percentages of subjects choosing the chair not facing the mirror and the reported intentionality of this choice. BPD = borderline personality disorder, HC = healthy control participants

Mentions: Regarding choice intentionality, more BPD patients (N = 27, 90.0 %) than HC (N = 8, 26.7 %) reported to have chosen the chair intentionally (p < .001, OR = 24.75). See Fig. 2 for graphical illustration. To explore whether the chosen seating influenced the choice intentionality, we compared the choice intentionality for those participants facing and not facing the mirror. Of the 21 HCs avoiding the mirror image, 28.6 % (N = 6) reported an intentional choice, which was similar to those facing the mirror (22.2 %, N = 2 out of N = 9, p = 1.00). Of the 27 BPD patients avoiding the mirror image, 92.6 % (N = 25) reported an intentional choice, while this was true for 66.6 % of those facing the mirror (N = 2 out of N = 3). The small sample size of BPD patients facing the mirror prevents a further statistical analysis and an investigation of modulating factors. However, it seems worth mentioning that those three patients who reported a non-consciousness seating choice reported lower RSQ-scores (9.5 SD 1.1) than 84.6 % of the BPD sample.Fig. 1


Can't stand the look in the mirror? Self-awareness avoidance in borderline personality disorder.

Winter D, Koplin K, Lis S - Borderline Personal Disord Emot Dysregul (2015)

Behavioral Results. Results on the behavioral self-awareness avoidance reflected by the percentages of subjects choosing the chair not facing the mirror and the reported intentionality of this choice. BPD = borderline personality disorder, HC = healthy control participants
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644295&req=5

Fig2: Behavioral Results. Results on the behavioral self-awareness avoidance reflected by the percentages of subjects choosing the chair not facing the mirror and the reported intentionality of this choice. BPD = borderline personality disorder, HC = healthy control participants
Mentions: Regarding choice intentionality, more BPD patients (N = 27, 90.0 %) than HC (N = 8, 26.7 %) reported to have chosen the chair intentionally (p < .001, OR = 24.75). See Fig. 2 for graphical illustration. To explore whether the chosen seating influenced the choice intentionality, we compared the choice intentionality for those participants facing and not facing the mirror. Of the 21 HCs avoiding the mirror image, 28.6 % (N = 6) reported an intentional choice, which was similar to those facing the mirror (22.2 %, N = 2 out of N = 9, p = 1.00). Of the 27 BPD patients avoiding the mirror image, 92.6 % (N = 25) reported an intentional choice, while this was true for 66.6 % of those facing the mirror (N = 2 out of N = 3). The small sample size of BPD patients facing the mirror prevents a further statistical analysis and an investigation of modulating factors. However, it seems worth mentioning that those three patients who reported a non-consciousness seating choice reported lower RSQ-scores (9.5 SD 1.1) than 84.6 % of the BPD sample.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Results revealed altered reactions to self-awareness cues in BPD.While BPD patients avoided such a cue slightly more often, they were more often aware of their behavior than healthy participants.As possible explanations, a negative body related, shame-prone self-concept as well as a simultaneously increased degree of self-focused attention are suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) expect and perceive social rejection stronger than healthy individuals. Shifting ones attention from oneself to others has been suggested as a mechanism to deal with the experience of social rejection. Here, we investigated whether BPD participants avoid increased self-awareness and whether this is done intentionally.

Methods: Thirty BPD patients and 30 healthy control participants, all naïve of the study's purpose, were asked to choose either a seat facing a mirror (self-awareness) or not facing the mirror (avoidance of self-awareness). Afterwards they were asked to indicate if they have chosen the seat intentionally.

Results: BPD patients avoided as a trend the chair facing the mirror more often than healthy control participants. 90 % of the patients reported that they made their seating decision intentionally in contrast to 26.7 % of the healthy participants (odd ratio = 24.75).

Conclusions: Results revealed altered reactions to self-awareness cues in BPD. While BPD patients avoided such a cue slightly more often, they were more often aware of their behavior than healthy participants. As possible explanations, a negative body related, shame-prone self-concept as well as a simultaneously increased degree of self-focused attention are suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus