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Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data.

Espinosa B, Hromadka TV, Perez R - MethodsX (2015)

Bottom Line: Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells.It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings.The paper establishes and describes•the need for "ground-truthing" of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hromadka & Associates, 29809 Santa Margarita Parkway Suite 102, RSM, CA 92688, United States.

ABSTRACT
Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for "ground-truthing" of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference.

No MeSH data available.


Radar station distances from subject rain gage.
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fig0010: Radar station distances from subject rain gage.

Mentions: Weather radar stations operate on a regional scale by emitting short bursts of radio waves and “listening” for the echo created by rain drops in the atmosphere. The radar antenna is usually set to scan 360°. Three radar stations [4] surrounding Gage 296 are shown in Fig. 2: KNKX San Diego (67 miles to the SW), KSOX Santa Ana Mountain (76 miles W) and KYUX Yuma (127 miles to the SE). The pictorial representation of the radar data is commonly used by news and weather stations and is frequently relied upon by the general public to visualize both the intensity and direction of a storm event. The radar data are recorded on a pixel basis. For each of the three radar stations, the radar data for the pixel which contained Gage 296 was examined.


Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data.

Espinosa B, Hromadka TV, Perez R - MethodsX (2015)

Radar station distances from subject rain gage.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644244&req=5

fig0010: Radar station distances from subject rain gage.
Mentions: Weather radar stations operate on a regional scale by emitting short bursts of radio waves and “listening” for the echo created by rain drops in the atmosphere. The radar antenna is usually set to scan 360°. Three radar stations [4] surrounding Gage 296 are shown in Fig. 2: KNKX San Diego (67 miles to the SW), KSOX Santa Ana Mountain (76 miles W) and KYUX Yuma (127 miles to the SE). The pictorial representation of the radar data is commonly used by news and weather stations and is frequently relied upon by the general public to visualize both the intensity and direction of a storm event. The radar data are recorded on a pixel basis. For each of the three radar stations, the radar data for the pixel which contained Gage 296 was examined.

Bottom Line: Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells.It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings.The paper establishes and describes•the need for "ground-truthing" of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hromadka & Associates, 29809 Santa Margarita Parkway Suite 102, RSM, CA 92688, United States.

ABSTRACT
Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for "ground-truthing" of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference.

No MeSH data available.