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Spectrophotometric Investigations of Macrolide Antibiotics: A Brief Review.

Keskar MR, Jugade RM - Anal Chem Insights (2015)

Bottom Line: They belong to the polyketide class of natural products.Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties.They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, R. T. M. Nagpur University, Nagpur, India.

ABSTRACT
Macrolides, one of the most commonly used class of antibiotics, are a group of drugs produced by Streptomyces species. They belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties. They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of macrolides such as chromatographic methods, flow injection methods, spectrofluorometric methods, spectrophotometric methods, and capillary electrophoresis methods. Among these methods, spectrophotometric methods are sensitive and cost effective for the analysis of various antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations as well as biological samples. This article reviews different spectrophotometric methods for the determination of macrolide antibiotics.

No MeSH data available.


Structures of (A) erythromycin, (B) clarithromycin, (C) roxithromycin, (D) azithromycin, and (E) josamycin.
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f1-aci-10-2015-029: Structures of (A) erythromycin, (B) clarithromycin, (C) roxithromycin, (D) azithromycin, and (E) josamycin.

Mentions: Erythromycin (Fig. 1A) is the first macrolide antibiotic. In 1949, some Fillipino scientists isolated erythromycin from a strain of Streptomyces erythreus from soil sample. It is available in the form of tablets, capsules, oral suspensions, ophthalmic solutions, ointments, gels, and injections. It is a white or slightly yellow crystal or powder with a melting point of 191°C and a dissociation constant pKa = 8.9.6 It is freely soluble in alcohols, acetone, chloroform, acetonitrile, and ethyl acetate and moderately soluble in ether, ethylene dichloride, and amyl acetate.


Spectrophotometric Investigations of Macrolide Antibiotics: A Brief Review.

Keskar MR, Jugade RM - Anal Chem Insights (2015)

Structures of (A) erythromycin, (B) clarithromycin, (C) roxithromycin, (D) azithromycin, and (E) josamycin.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644142&req=5

f1-aci-10-2015-029: Structures of (A) erythromycin, (B) clarithromycin, (C) roxithromycin, (D) azithromycin, and (E) josamycin.
Mentions: Erythromycin (Fig. 1A) is the first macrolide antibiotic. In 1949, some Fillipino scientists isolated erythromycin from a strain of Streptomyces erythreus from soil sample. It is available in the form of tablets, capsules, oral suspensions, ophthalmic solutions, ointments, gels, and injections. It is a white or slightly yellow crystal or powder with a melting point of 191°C and a dissociation constant pKa = 8.9.6 It is freely soluble in alcohols, acetone, chloroform, acetonitrile, and ethyl acetate and moderately soluble in ether, ethylene dichloride, and amyl acetate.

Bottom Line: They belong to the polyketide class of natural products.Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties.They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, R. T. M. Nagpur University, Nagpur, India.

ABSTRACT
Macrolides, one of the most commonly used class of antibiotics, are a group of drugs produced by Streptomyces species. They belong to the polyketide class of natural products. Their activity is due to the presence of a large macrolide lactone ring with deoxy sugar moieties. They are protein synthesis inhibitors and broad-spectrum antibiotics, active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different analytical techniques have been reported for the determination of macrolides such as chromatographic methods, flow injection methods, spectrofluorometric methods, spectrophotometric methods, and capillary electrophoresis methods. Among these methods, spectrophotometric methods are sensitive and cost effective for the analysis of various antibiotics in pharmaceutical formulations as well as biological samples. This article reviews different spectrophotometric methods for the determination of macrolide antibiotics.

No MeSH data available.