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(99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy of the hand: comparing the use of novel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and routine NaI(Tl) detectors.

Koulikov V, Lerman H, Kesler M, Even-Sapir E - EJNMMI Res (2015)

Bottom Line: On FD CZT data, 385 joints were identified compared to 168 on NaI(Tl) data (p < 0.001).There was no statistically significant difference in delineation of joints between FD and RD CZT data as the latter identified 383 joints.The superior physical characteristics of this technique raised a potential reduction in administered dose and/or acquisition time without compromising image quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 6 Weizman Street, Tel-Aviv, 64239, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors have been recently introduced in the field of nuclear medicine in cardiology and breast imaging. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the performance of the novel detectors (CZT) compared to that of the routine NaI(Tl) in bone scintigraphy. A dual-headed CZT-based camera dedicated originally to breast imaging has been used, and in view of the limited size of the detectors, the hands were chosen as the organ for assessment. This is a clinical study.

Methods: Fifty-eight consecutive patients (total 116 hands) referred for bone scan for suspected hand pathology gave their informed consent to have two acquisitions, using the routine camera and the CZT-based camera. The latter was divided into full-dose full-acquisition time (FD CZT) and reduced-dose short-acquisition time (RD CZT) on CZT technology, so three image sets were available for analysis. Data analysis included comparing the detection of hot lesions and identification of the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints.

Results: A total of 69 hot lesions were detected on the CZT image sets; of these, 61 were identified as focal sites of uptake on NaI(Tl) data. On FD CZT data, 385 joints were identified compared to 168 on NaI(Tl) data (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in delineation of joints between FD and RD CZT data as the latter identified 383 joints.

Conclusions: Bone scintigraphy using a CZT-based gamma camera is associated with improved lesion detection and anatomic definition. The superior physical characteristics of this technique raised a potential reduction in administered dose and/or acquisition time without compromising image quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 71-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. On both image data, multiple joints appear to be associated with increased uptake. On the CZT data, uptake is located on both sides of the joint space (arrow) and the increased uptake at the metacarpophalangeal region of the index finger appears to be a sesamoid bone (arrowhead)
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Fig4: A 71-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. On both image data, multiple joints appear to be associated with increased uptake. On the CZT data, uptake is located on both sides of the joint space (arrow) and the increased uptake at the metacarpophalangeal region of the index finger appears to be a sesamoid bone (arrowhead)

Mentions: Sixty-nine hot lesions were identified on CZT data whereas only 61 focal sites of increased uptake were recorded on NaI(Tl) images (no statistically significant difference) (Figs. 3 and 4).Fig. 3


(99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy of the hand: comparing the use of novel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and routine NaI(Tl) detectors.

Koulikov V, Lerman H, Kesler M, Even-Sapir E - EJNMMI Res (2015)

A 71-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. On both image data, multiple joints appear to be associated with increased uptake. On the CZT data, uptake is located on both sides of the joint space (arrow) and the increased uptake at the metacarpophalangeal region of the index finger appears to be a sesamoid bone (arrowhead)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644133&req=5

Fig4: A 71-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. On both image data, multiple joints appear to be associated with increased uptake. On the CZT data, uptake is located on both sides of the joint space (arrow) and the increased uptake at the metacarpophalangeal region of the index finger appears to be a sesamoid bone (arrowhead)
Mentions: Sixty-nine hot lesions were identified on CZT data whereas only 61 focal sites of increased uptake were recorded on NaI(Tl) images (no statistically significant difference) (Figs. 3 and 4).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: On FD CZT data, 385 joints were identified compared to 168 on NaI(Tl) data (p < 0.001).There was no statistically significant difference in delineation of joints between FD and RD CZT data as the latter identified 383 joints.The superior physical characteristics of this technique raised a potential reduction in administered dose and/or acquisition time without compromising image quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, 6 Weizman Street, Tel-Aviv, 64239, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors have been recently introduced in the field of nuclear medicine in cardiology and breast imaging. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the performance of the novel detectors (CZT) compared to that of the routine NaI(Tl) in bone scintigraphy. A dual-headed CZT-based camera dedicated originally to breast imaging has been used, and in view of the limited size of the detectors, the hands were chosen as the organ for assessment. This is a clinical study.

Methods: Fifty-eight consecutive patients (total 116 hands) referred for bone scan for suspected hand pathology gave their informed consent to have two acquisitions, using the routine camera and the CZT-based camera. The latter was divided into full-dose full-acquisition time (FD CZT) and reduced-dose short-acquisition time (RD CZT) on CZT technology, so three image sets were available for analysis. Data analysis included comparing the detection of hot lesions and identification of the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints.

Results: A total of 69 hot lesions were detected on the CZT image sets; of these, 61 were identified as focal sites of uptake on NaI(Tl) data. On FD CZT data, 385 joints were identified compared to 168 on NaI(Tl) data (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in delineation of joints between FD and RD CZT data as the latter identified 383 joints.

Conclusions: Bone scintigraphy using a CZT-based gamma camera is associated with improved lesion detection and anatomic definition. The superior physical characteristics of this technique raised a potential reduction in administered dose and/or acquisition time without compromising image quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus