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Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers.

Bucher J, Donovan C, Ohman-Strickland P, McCoy J - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant.The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003).There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively.

Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups.

Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands.

Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequencies (percentages) and means (standard deviations, SDs) for participant characteristics and responses of emergency medical services personnel in hand hygiene study.EMT, emergency medical technician; AEMT, advanced emergency medical technician; BSI, body substance isolation; BBP, blood borne pathogens
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f1-wjem-16-727: Frequencies (percentages) and means (standard deviations, SDs) for participant characteristics and responses of emergency medical services personnel in hand hygiene study.EMT, emergency medical technician; AEMT, advanced emergency medical technician; BSI, body substance isolation; BBP, blood borne pathogens

Mentions: There were 1,494 survey respondents. Overall frequencies (percentages) as well as means with SDs are presented in Figure 1. Mean responses stratified by participant characteristics are presented in Figure 2, along with p-values for differences between the subgroups, 95% confidence intervals (CI) and the absolute number of responses.


Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers.

Bucher J, Donovan C, Ohman-Strickland P, McCoy J - West J Emerg Med (2015)

Frequencies (percentages) and means (standard deviations, SDs) for participant characteristics and responses of emergency medical services personnel in hand hygiene study.EMT, emergency medical technician; AEMT, advanced emergency medical technician; BSI, body substance isolation; BBP, blood borne pathogens
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4644042&req=5

f1-wjem-16-727: Frequencies (percentages) and means (standard deviations, SDs) for participant characteristics and responses of emergency medical services personnel in hand hygiene study.EMT, emergency medical technician; AEMT, advanced emergency medical technician; BSI, body substance isolation; BBP, blood borne pathogens
Mentions: There were 1,494 survey respondents. Overall frequencies (percentages) as well as means with SDs are presented in Figure 1. Mean responses stratified by participant characteristics are presented in Figure 2, along with p-values for differences between the subgroups, 95% confidence intervals (CI) and the absolute number of responses.

Bottom Line: Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant.The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003).There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively.

Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups.

Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands.

Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus