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Smokers' sources of e-cigarette awareness and risk information.

Wackowski OA, Bover Manderski MT, Delnevo CD - Prev Med Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: However, 79.5% felt e-cigarette safety information was important.Over one-third said they would turn to a doctor first for e-cigarette safety information, though almost a quarter said they would turn to the Internet or product packaging first.Most (59.6%) ranked doctors as the most trustworthy risk source, and 6.8% had asked a health professional about e-cigarettes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers School of Public Health, Center for Tobacco Studies, 335 George Street, Suite 2100, New Brunswick, NJ 08901.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Few studies have explored sources of e-cigarette awareness and peoples' e-cigarette information needs, interests or behaviors. This study contributes to both domains of e-cigarette research.

Methods: Results are based on a 2014 e-cigarette focused survey of 519 current smokers from a nationally representative research panel.

Results: Smokers most frequently reported seeing e-cigarettes in stores (86.4%) and used in person (83%). Many (73%) had also heard about e-cigarettes from known users, broadcast media ads (68%), other (print, online) advertisements (71.5%), and/or from the news (60.9%); sources of awareness varied by e-cigarette experience. Most smokers (59.9%) believed e-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes, a belief attributed to "common sense" (76.4%), the news (39.2%) and advertisements (37.2%). However, 79.5% felt e-cigarette safety information was important. Over one-third said they would turn to a doctor first for e-cigarette safety information, though almost a quarter said they would turn to the Internet or product packaging first. Most (59.6%) ranked doctors as the most trustworthy risk source, and 6.8% had asked a health professional about e-cigarettes.

Conclusions: Future research should explore the content of e-cigarette information sources, their potential impact, and ways they might be strengthened or changed through regulatory and/or educational efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage of smokers' ranking different e-cigarette information sources by likelihood of use and trustworthiness, 2014.
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f0005: Percentage of smokers' ranking different e-cigarette information sources by likelihood of use and trustworthiness, 2014.

Mentions: Beliefs about the importance of having e-cigarette safety information in the context of future or continued e-cigarette use were rated on a 4-point Likert scale ranging from “not at all important” to “very important,” and a yes/no question assessed whether smokers had asked a health care professional about e-cigarettes. Respondents were also asked to rank the order in which they would most likely use a list of five potential information sources (see Fig. 1) to get more information about potential e-cigarette risks, where “1” represented the source they would likely turn to first and “5” being the source they would likely use last. Respondents were then asked to rank the same five sources with respect to trustworthiness. For both ranking questions, choices were presented in randomized order. Prior to survey implementation, cognitive interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 10 smokers to assess respondent understanding of questions.


Smokers' sources of e-cigarette awareness and risk information.

Wackowski OA, Bover Manderski MT, Delnevo CD - Prev Med Rep (2015)

Percentage of smokers' ranking different e-cigarette information sources by likelihood of use and trustworthiness, 2014.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643950&req=5

f0005: Percentage of smokers' ranking different e-cigarette information sources by likelihood of use and trustworthiness, 2014.
Mentions: Beliefs about the importance of having e-cigarette safety information in the context of future or continued e-cigarette use were rated on a 4-point Likert scale ranging from “not at all important” to “very important,” and a yes/no question assessed whether smokers had asked a health care professional about e-cigarettes. Respondents were also asked to rank the order in which they would most likely use a list of five potential information sources (see Fig. 1) to get more information about potential e-cigarette risks, where “1” represented the source they would likely turn to first and “5” being the source they would likely use last. Respondents were then asked to rank the same five sources with respect to trustworthiness. For both ranking questions, choices were presented in randomized order. Prior to survey implementation, cognitive interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 10 smokers to assess respondent understanding of questions.

Bottom Line: However, 79.5% felt e-cigarette safety information was important.Over one-third said they would turn to a doctor first for e-cigarette safety information, though almost a quarter said they would turn to the Internet or product packaging first.Most (59.6%) ranked doctors as the most trustworthy risk source, and 6.8% had asked a health professional about e-cigarettes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers School of Public Health, Center for Tobacco Studies, 335 George Street, Suite 2100, New Brunswick, NJ 08901.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Few studies have explored sources of e-cigarette awareness and peoples' e-cigarette information needs, interests or behaviors. This study contributes to both domains of e-cigarette research.

Methods: Results are based on a 2014 e-cigarette focused survey of 519 current smokers from a nationally representative research panel.

Results: Smokers most frequently reported seeing e-cigarettes in stores (86.4%) and used in person (83%). Many (73%) had also heard about e-cigarettes from known users, broadcast media ads (68%), other (print, online) advertisements (71.5%), and/or from the news (60.9%); sources of awareness varied by e-cigarette experience. Most smokers (59.9%) believed e-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes, a belief attributed to "common sense" (76.4%), the news (39.2%) and advertisements (37.2%). However, 79.5% felt e-cigarette safety information was important. Over one-third said they would turn to a doctor first for e-cigarette safety information, though almost a quarter said they would turn to the Internet or product packaging first. Most (59.6%) ranked doctors as the most trustworthy risk source, and 6.8% had asked a health professional about e-cigarettes.

Conclusions: Future research should explore the content of e-cigarette information sources, their potential impact, and ways they might be strengthened or changed through regulatory and/or educational efforts.

No MeSH data available.