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Natural and sexual selection act on different axes of variation in avian plumage color.

Dunn PO, Armenta JK, Whittingham LA - Sci Adv (2015)

Bottom Line: The bright colors of birds are often attributed to sexual selection on males, but in many species both sexes are colorful and it has been long debated whether sexual selection can also explain this variation.We show that most evolutionary transitions in color have been toward similar plumage in both sexes, and the color of both sexes (for example, bright or dull) was associated with indices of natural selection (for example, habitat type), whereas sexual differences in color were primarily associated with indices of sexual selection on males (for example, polygyny and large testes size).Debate about the evolution of bird coloration can be resolved by recognizing that both natural and sexual selection have been influential, but they have generally acted on two different axes: sexual selection on an axis of sexual differences and natural selection on both sexes for the type of color (for example, bright or dull).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.

ABSTRACT
The bright colors of birds are often attributed to sexual selection on males, but in many species both sexes are colorful and it has been long debated whether sexual selection can also explain this variation. We show that most evolutionary transitions in color have been toward similar plumage in both sexes, and the color of both sexes (for example, bright or dull) was associated with indices of natural selection (for example, habitat type), whereas sexual differences in color were primarily associated with indices of sexual selection on males (for example, polygyny and large testes size). Debate about the evolution of bird coloration can be resolved by recognizing that both natural and sexual selection have been influential, but they have generally acted on two different axes: sexual selection on an axis of sexual differences and natural selection on both sexes for the type of color (for example, bright or dull).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plumage brightness (PC1) for each sex in relation to morphological, ecological, and behavioral traits.Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). Regression lines from PGLS models are shown for each sex (males, blue; females, red) plotted against the original body and testes mass data. P values for nest height refer to interactions between nest height and male parental care [coded yes (solid line) or no (dashed line)]. Dichromatism is the sum of PC scores for males minus the sum for females.
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Figure 3: Plumage brightness (PC1) for each sex in relation to morphological, ecological, and behavioral traits.Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). Regression lines from PGLS models are shown for each sex (males, blue; females, red) plotted against the original body and testes mass data. P values for nest height refer to interactions between nest height and male parental care [coded yes (solid line) or no (dashed line)]. Dichromatism is the sum of PC scores for males minus the sum for females.

Mentions: Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). See Fig. 3 legend for more details.


Natural and sexual selection act on different axes of variation in avian plumage color.

Dunn PO, Armenta JK, Whittingham LA - Sci Adv (2015)

Plumage brightness (PC1) for each sex in relation to morphological, ecological, and behavioral traits.Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). Regression lines from PGLS models are shown for each sex (males, blue; females, red) plotted against the original body and testes mass data. P values for nest height refer to interactions between nest height and male parental care [coded yes (solid line) or no (dashed line)]. Dichromatism is the sum of PC scores for males minus the sum for females.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643820&req=5

Figure 3: Plumage brightness (PC1) for each sex in relation to morphological, ecological, and behavioral traits.Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). Regression lines from PGLS models are shown for each sex (males, blue; females, red) plotted against the original body and testes mass data. P values for nest height refer to interactions between nest height and male parental care [coded yes (solid line) or no (dashed line)]. Dichromatism is the sum of PC scores for males minus the sum for females.
Mentions: Mean and P values are based on full PGLS models (table S3). See Fig. 3 legend for more details.

Bottom Line: The bright colors of birds are often attributed to sexual selection on males, but in many species both sexes are colorful and it has been long debated whether sexual selection can also explain this variation.We show that most evolutionary transitions in color have been toward similar plumage in both sexes, and the color of both sexes (for example, bright or dull) was associated with indices of natural selection (for example, habitat type), whereas sexual differences in color were primarily associated with indices of sexual selection on males (for example, polygyny and large testes size).Debate about the evolution of bird coloration can be resolved by recognizing that both natural and sexual selection have been influential, but they have generally acted on two different axes: sexual selection on an axis of sexual differences and natural selection on both sexes for the type of color (for example, bright or dull).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.

ABSTRACT
The bright colors of birds are often attributed to sexual selection on males, but in many species both sexes are colorful and it has been long debated whether sexual selection can also explain this variation. We show that most evolutionary transitions in color have been toward similar plumage in both sexes, and the color of both sexes (for example, bright or dull) was associated with indices of natural selection (for example, habitat type), whereas sexual differences in color were primarily associated with indices of sexual selection on males (for example, polygyny and large testes size). Debate about the evolution of bird coloration can be resolved by recognizing that both natural and sexual selection have been influential, but they have generally acted on two different axes: sexual selection on an axis of sexual differences and natural selection on both sexes for the type of color (for example, bright or dull).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus