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Carbon-based electrocatalysts for advanced energy conversion and storage.

Zhang J, Xia Z, Dai L - Sci Adv (2015)

Bottom Line: Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play curial roles in electrochemical energy conversion and storage, including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.Having rich multidimensional nanoarchitectures [for example, zero-dimensional (0D) fullerenes, 1D carbon nanotubes, 2D graphene, and 3D graphite] with tunable electronic and surface characteristics, various carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to act as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR and OER in fuel cells and batteries.We present a critical review on the recent advances in carbon-based metal-free catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries, and discuss the perspectives and challenges in this rapidly developing field of practical significance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon (Case4Carbon), Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play curial roles in electrochemical energy conversion and storage, including fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Having rich multidimensional nanoarchitectures [for example, zero-dimensional (0D) fullerenes, 1D carbon nanotubes, 2D graphene, and 3D graphite] with tunable electronic and surface characteristics, various carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to act as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR and OER in fuel cells and batteries. We present a critical review on the recent advances in carbon-based metal-free catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries, and discuss the perspectives and challenges in this rapidly developing field of practical significance.

No MeSH data available.


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Illustrated interfaces of air electrodes and proposed electrode structures.(A) Gas-solid-liquid three-phase interface model in aqueous electrolytes. (B) Liquid-solid two-phase interface model in nonaqueous electrolytes. [From F. Cheng, J. Chen, Metal–air batteries: From oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts. Chem. Soc. Rev.41, 2172–2192 (2012). Reprinted with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry.]
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Figure 8: Illustrated interfaces of air electrodes and proposed electrode structures.(A) Gas-solid-liquid three-phase interface model in aqueous electrolytes. (B) Liquid-solid two-phase interface model in nonaqueous electrolytes. [From F. Cheng, J. Chen, Metal–air batteries: From oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts. Chem. Soc. Rev.41, 2172–2192 (2012). Reprinted with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry.]

Mentions: Because of their high theoretical energy density, Li-air batteries, particularly those utilizing nonaqueous electrolytes with substantially high capacities, have been the main focus of recent research efforts (2, 133). However, the Zn-air battery technology is of particular interest because of its significantly lower cost and much better safety than its Li counterpart. In an aqueous Li-air battery, oxygen is reduced to hydroxyl ions (or hydroperoxide ions) during discharge to combine with Li ions from the anode into soluble LiOH. The overall reaction that occurs at the three-phase zone (Fig. 8A) in a Li-air battery is given in Eq. 5:


Carbon-based electrocatalysts for advanced energy conversion and storage.

Zhang J, Xia Z, Dai L - Sci Adv (2015)

Illustrated interfaces of air electrodes and proposed electrode structures.(A) Gas-solid-liquid three-phase interface model in aqueous electrolytes. (B) Liquid-solid two-phase interface model in nonaqueous electrolytes. [From F. Cheng, J. Chen, Metal–air batteries: From oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts. Chem. Soc. Rev.41, 2172–2192 (2012). Reprinted with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry.]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643813&req=5

Figure 8: Illustrated interfaces of air electrodes and proposed electrode structures.(A) Gas-solid-liquid three-phase interface model in aqueous electrolytes. (B) Liquid-solid two-phase interface model in nonaqueous electrolytes. [From F. Cheng, J. Chen, Metal–air batteries: From oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts. Chem. Soc. Rev.41, 2172–2192 (2012). Reprinted with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry.]
Mentions: Because of their high theoretical energy density, Li-air batteries, particularly those utilizing nonaqueous electrolytes with substantially high capacities, have been the main focus of recent research efforts (2, 133). However, the Zn-air battery technology is of particular interest because of its significantly lower cost and much better safety than its Li counterpart. In an aqueous Li-air battery, oxygen is reduced to hydroxyl ions (or hydroperoxide ions) during discharge to combine with Li ions from the anode into soluble LiOH. The overall reaction that occurs at the three-phase zone (Fig. 8A) in a Li-air battery is given in Eq. 5:

Bottom Line: Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play curial roles in electrochemical energy conversion and storage, including fuel cells and metal-air batteries.Having rich multidimensional nanoarchitectures [for example, zero-dimensional (0D) fullerenes, 1D carbon nanotubes, 2D graphene, and 3D graphite] with tunable electronic and surface characteristics, various carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to act as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR and OER in fuel cells and batteries.We present a critical review on the recent advances in carbon-based metal-free catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries, and discuss the perspectives and challenges in this rapidly developing field of practical significance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon (Case4Carbon), Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) play curial roles in electrochemical energy conversion and storage, including fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Having rich multidimensional nanoarchitectures [for example, zero-dimensional (0D) fullerenes, 1D carbon nanotubes, 2D graphene, and 3D graphite] with tunable electronic and surface characteristics, various carbon nanomaterials have been demonstrated to act as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR and OER in fuel cells and batteries. We present a critical review on the recent advances in carbon-based metal-free catalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries, and discuss the perspectives and challenges in this rapidly developing field of practical significance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus