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A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees.

Mao W, Schuler MA, Berenbaum MR - Sci Adv (2015)

Bottom Line: RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination.Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development.Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801-3795, USA.

ABSTRACT
In the eusocial honey bee Apis mellifera, with reproductive queens and sterile workers, a female larva's developmental fate depends on its diet; nurse bees feed queen-destined larvae exclusively royal jelly, a glandular secretion, but worker-destined larvae receive royal jelly for 3 days and subsequently jelly to which honey and beebread are added. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination. Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development. Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

edgeR’ multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) showing relationships among all pairs of samples (two treatments) and replicates (3 replicates per treatment).Treatments comprise larval honey bees consuming artificial diet and larval honey bees consuming artificial diet with p-coumaric acid. CK denotes control treatment; CA denotes 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatment. Control and treatment samples group separately when plotted.
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Figure 1: edgeR’ multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) showing relationships among all pairs of samples (two treatments) and replicates (3 replicates per treatment).Treatments comprise larval honey bees consuming artificial diet and larval honey bees consuming artificial diet with p-coumaric acid. CK denotes control treatment; CA denotes 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatment. Control and treatment samples group separately when plotted.

Mentions: Before differential expression analysis, the variation between the three biological replicates and between the two treatments (rearing on diets with and without 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid) was assessed using a multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot. Biological replicates of control treatments clustered closely, whereas those of the 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatments did not, indicating variation among replicates (in the first dimension) and among library preparations (in the second dimension) (Fig. 1). Despite this variation, the samples of both treatments were well separated in the first dimension, indicating that the sequencing data were qualified for differentially expressed gene (DEG) identification. To investigate p-coumaric acid effects on larval development, we used edgeR (18) to identify DEGs between control and 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatments (Fig. 2). Among the 5344 DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR), <0.05], 2663 were up-regulated (representing about one-third of the genome) and 2681 were down-regulated (table S2).


A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees.

Mao W, Schuler MA, Berenbaum MR - Sci Adv (2015)

edgeR’ multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) showing relationships among all pairs of samples (two treatments) and replicates (3 replicates per treatment).Treatments comprise larval honey bees consuming artificial diet and larval honey bees consuming artificial diet with p-coumaric acid. CK denotes control treatment; CA denotes 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatment. Control and treatment samples group separately when plotted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4643792&req=5

Figure 1: edgeR’ multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) showing relationships among all pairs of samples (two treatments) and replicates (3 replicates per treatment).Treatments comprise larval honey bees consuming artificial diet and larval honey bees consuming artificial diet with p-coumaric acid. CK denotes control treatment; CA denotes 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatment. Control and treatment samples group separately when plotted.
Mentions: Before differential expression analysis, the variation between the three biological replicates and between the two treatments (rearing on diets with and without 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid) was assessed using a multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot. Biological replicates of control treatments clustered closely, whereas those of the 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatments did not, indicating variation among replicates (in the first dimension) and among library preparations (in the second dimension) (Fig. 1). Despite this variation, the samples of both treatments were well separated in the first dimension, indicating that the sequencing data were qualified for differentially expressed gene (DEG) identification. To investigate p-coumaric acid effects on larval development, we used edgeR (18) to identify DEGs between control and 0.5 mM p-coumaric acid treatments (Fig. 2). Among the 5344 DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR), <0.05], 2663 were up-regulated (representing about one-third of the genome) and 2681 were down-regulated (table S2).

Bottom Line: RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination.Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development.Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801-3795, USA.

ABSTRACT
In the eusocial honey bee Apis mellifera, with reproductive queens and sterile workers, a female larva's developmental fate depends on its diet; nurse bees feed queen-destined larvae exclusively royal jelly, a glandular secretion, but worker-destined larvae receive royal jelly for 3 days and subsequently jelly to which honey and beebread are added. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination. Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development. Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus